Whipstaff (broomstick) vertical tiller inside helm station - Roger Taylor's version...

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Angélique, Mar 16, 2018.

  1. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    There are various ways to route the steering lines based on cockpit size and layout and on personal preference.

    For some ± examples I've grabbed the below pics from the TillerClutch website, just use a clamp or knot were it says TillerClutch, and pulleys were it says cleats or fairleads in those sketches, and then run the lines forward to the whipstaff, and use pulleys wherever you take corners, as per the post #1 pics & vids.

    [​IMG] - - - - [​IMG]

    [​IMG] - - - - [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2018
  2. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    The steering lines can be slack and/or detached from the tiller when the whipstaff is not in use I think.
     
  3. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    On a transom mounted rudder the steering lines can also be attached directly to the rudder, like on the Herreshoff Coquina . . .

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    ‘‘ . . . Steering is as designed by Herreshoff: a rope through the transom and running around the perimeter of the interior. . . . ’’

    [​IMG]
    pinterest #1

    [​IMG]
    pinterest #2
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2018
  4. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Some suggestions for steering line routings on transom mounted rudders from the WoodenBoat forums:


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Below some for a outboard bracket rope steering setup...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Note this is all no tiller nor whipstaff nor wheel operated steering, but it's hands on the rope steering by a rope that runs through the transom and then around the perimeter of the interior, but instead of that the ropes could also be attached to a whipstaff on a convenient place.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2018
  5. goodwilltoall
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    goodwilltoall Senior Member

    There are a multitude of ways to route linkages or cable, all more complicated than a tiller to rudder, about as complex as setting up a wheel.

    Already built a wheel steered system but whipstaff was second on list. On narrow boats or pinched sterns it is particularly helpful as it allows easier passage aft than either a wheel or tiller and can allow for non interference room for travler or other tie downs.

    Will try to find a neat simple lever whipstaff drawing Bolger designed for one of boats.
     
  6. goodwilltoall
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    goodwilltoall Senior Member

    OzFred, how is that possible to go fwd/aft? Its connected to rudder to steer boat left or right.
     
  7. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Any time to introduce elements into the steering assembly, you'll lose things, like feel, gain friction, etc. A simple tiller attached to the shaft or blade is the most responsive, though some boats may need something more practical or with more power.
     
  8. Earl Boebert
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    Earl Boebert Senior Member

    FYI, here's a link to the an thread of using whipstaff steering (or at least what the authors characterized as whipstaff steering -- I doubt there is an official definition) on Footy class model yachts:

    Whipstaff, my way http://www.rcsailing.net/forum1/showthread.php?4936-Whipstaff-my-way

    I should note that first person to bring this to the attention of the Footy community (I was on the Footy class technical committee at the time) was Angus Richardson, now sadly deceased. He was a great guy, a great friend, and someone who coped magnificently with severe physical disability.

    Cheers,

    Earl
     
  9. tspeer
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    tspeer Senior Member

    There are some modern boats that have used whipstaff tillers, too. The Hammerhead 34 trimaran Spartina has a whipstaff tiller. The Hammerhead 34 has a compact center cockpit, and on the other Hammerhead 34, Blue Skyz, the tiller is mounted at the aft end of the cockpit and spans nearly the entire length of the cockpit, with the end just aft of the companionway at about the level of the seat. The owner of Spartina had a previous boat with a tiller like that, and he nearly knocked himself out once by hitting his head on the end of the tiller as he emerged from the cabin. So when he built Spartina, he went with a whipstaff tiller bent in the shape of an inverted J that was just ahead of the aft cabin.

    When the AC72 17 made its first sails in 2012, it was equipped with twin whipstaff tilllers.
    [​IMG]
    The design requirement from the crew was they wanted to the skipper to be able to control the boat continuously while tacking and gybing as he moved from one side to the other. The dual whipstaffs connected with a crossbar allowed him to stand anywhere on the aft beam and control the boat. Unfortunately, it was found that the whipstaff tillers were not long enough to provide sufficient mechanical advantage to steer the boat with acceptable control forces. The whipstaff tillers were replaced with conventional tillers, which were replaced with even longer tillers. Eventually, they had to go to wheel steering to get the mechanical advantage they needed, and that precluded the skipper from being able to steer while crossing over.
     
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  10. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    That's an interesting update Tom, thanks . . :)
     
  11. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    Very interesting Tom and thanks for sharing the steering evolution of the AC72. Too bad they weren't able to mount a center helm with a wheel for better visibility. Interesting how the whipstaff tiller has come out of the ages and back again with the AC72. One can understand the frustration of being knocked by a tiller arm and wanting this vertical steering solution. If the linkage is well built it should work well. The longer the lever, the more force you can apply of course. Yet, I can see why they opted for steering cables. You can take advantage of the sprocket sizes and clever cable routing for ease of steering. I wonder if it was manual steering linkage or hydraulic assist. I would have preferred to feel the waves with raw steering linkage. Either way good stuff!
     
  12. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    Interesting to say the least Angelique! Thanks for sharing. I can't imaging steering a ship like that with an army of elves below decks.

    "Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain!" - Wizard of Oz
     
  13. OzFred
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    OzFred Senior Member

    Sorry, but I don't know what you're referring to here.
     
  14. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    I'll think this is the sequence.... post #15 ---> #21
    I've added (nowadays) to the last sentence in the quote for clarity.​
    For an answer best look at the post #1 Vasa video and study the Vasa whipstaff picture there, and you might see that the one deck level lower placed horizontal tiller moves contra to the manual input on top end of the whipstaff, like Fred said above in some other wording.


    The whipstaff goes hinged through the deck, and the below end of the whipstaff, which is connected to the one deck level lower placed horizontal tiller, moves opposite to the manually operated top end of the whipstaff.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2018

  15. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Eek . . . behind that curtain hides a very bad man . . . :eek:

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2018
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