which hull material

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by jbehr, Sep 23, 2010.

  1. jbehr
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    jbehr Junior Member

    what is the best hull material for a sailboat of around 40 ft for a coastal/ocean going vessel in which it would be traversed through many latitudes
     
  2. Raggi_Thor
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    Raggi_Thor Nav.arch/Designer/Builder

  3. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    depends
     
  4. jbehr
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    jbehr Junior Member

    hello again richard how are you today?
    might i ask what it depends on?
     
  5. Raggi_Thor
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    Raggi_Thor Nav.arch/Designer/Builder

    Ice? ?
     
  6. apex1

    apex1 Guest

  7. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Jbehr, the choice of hull material has a lot to do with several factors, one of which is it's expected sea going environment.

    At 40' steel is starting to become a competitive material, compared to 'glass and wood, in regard to price of construction per pound. Smaller craft in steel would tend to be heavier then necessary. 'Glass and wood at getting toward the end of their competitive range, but technique and building method can address this to some degree. This is just the cost per pound angle.

    Hull material also has a lot to do with who's building it. What's available locally, owner's preferences and a few other factors.

    Richard's "Design Spiral" thread is an informational start, but meaningless without a designer keeping you focused. Download the WestLawn text and have a look at what you'll be addressing, then continue your search for a yacht designer.
     
  8. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    Absolutely depends on the design. What kind of boat did you have in mind? Remember, long and lean works really well if you have a long way (across the Pacific) to go. But long means fifty feet for high sustained speed and lean means light displacement for good performance. Are you going to maintain it yourself or will you pay pros? Steel is great for a one-off. Being a shipwright I prefer wood myself. A fifty foot 1 1/8" thick hull can be cold-molded much faster than any other method, it's easy to fasten things to it, it's climate-resistant if properly sealed and sheathed, and design-flexible. I once watched two older NZ shipwrights(!) loft and plank a 40 foot ocean racer with eight laminations (all at 45degrees to the keel) and turn the hull over in 8 working days. I am not making this up. They used Weldwood, not epoxy for the lams, but sheathed it with Dynel and epoxy and sealed the inside with epoxy resin thinned with alcohol. I can't think of how to do that in any other material and come out with a fair round hull in about a week that has built in insulation, terrific strength-to-weight ratio etc.
     
  9. rugludallur
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    rugludallur Rugludallur

  10. peter radclyffe
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    peter radclyffe Senior Member

    steel
     
  11. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Steel?
     
  12. peter radclyffe
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    peter radclyffe Senior Member

    yes, as you know steel will bounce off reefs
     
  13. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Ahh, then,

    steel.
     
  14. Raggi_Thor
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    Raggi_Thor Nav.arch/Designer/Builder

    Or wood
    Or alu
    Or grp

    :)
     

  15. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Wood and Alu I understand, but whats grp?

    glass + resin = problem?

    :p
     
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