Which clear epoxy for teak bright work ??

Discussion in 'Materials' started by pescaloco, Oct 20, 2009.

  1. pescaloco
    Joined: Feb 2006
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    pescaloco Senior Member

    Hey guys

    I was wonder which low blush epoxy you like to lay down as a base for teak bright work. Reasonable price and good clarity would be ideal

    Thanks
     
  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    In general, epoxy is a bad choice because it has little UV resistance. West makes an two part varnish that builds up fast. It is adviseable to use a marine varnish over it. These are expensive products.
     
  3. pescaloco
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    pescaloco Senior Member

    Thanks Gonzo

    I want to take and apply 2-3 coats of a good clear epoxy to build thickness and seal the teak then top coat with 2 coats of Uv varnish

    I actually have not done teak this way but understand it works well and can really speed the process............versus 7 or 8 coats of varnish .or 10
     
  4. jmolan
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    jmolan Junior Member

  5. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    You may find this test interesting, the six "main" products in the US tested:

    http://www.oneoceankayaks.com/Epoxresl.htm

    Be anal on cleaning the teak surface, and apply three layers of resin and three coats of varnish!

    Regards
    Richard
     
  6. bntii
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    bntii Senior Member

    The clear coating hardener from West Systems is #207. You can also use two part clear coating systems such as Bristol finish to gain a very hard UV resistant finish.

    In my experience epoxies and the like are not worth the trouble for bright work. If you are building a bright composite structure like a stripped canoe its one thing, to just do exterior teak bright work I now skip the two parts.

    I use the Epiphanies products and have a good service with the stuff. The 'Woodfinish' products in the line can be over coated with out sanding out to get high build fast. I usually go 4 to 6 coats, sand out, 4 more coats, sand out then finish with 2 coats of the standard Epipfanies varnish thinned properly for good flow.

    Remember- everyone falls in love with epoxy when they first start working on boats, eventually they learn when to use it and when to not..
     
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  7. pescaloco
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    pescaloco Senior Member

    Thanks for the links and replies I really appreciate it
     
  8. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Good call bntii - the brochures make it sound so easy, but its definitely not.
     
  9. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Well, for some reason bntii,

    it DOES give some good moisture protection! I would´nt waste the money on every boat produced, if it was´nt for a good reason! So do my competitors.

    And watson,
    it definetively IS!

    Regards
    Richard
     
  10. bntii
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    bntii Senior Member

    Now where the hell did I leave my sword....

    [​IMG]

    Can't argue too much- epoxy is one of the best things to come along.
    Easy to use...
    Perfect for everywhere one should use it..
    :p

    Are you undercoating the bright work on your builds with epoxy then Richard?
     
  11. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Yes...
    All wooden surface is encapsulated, no matter if painted or varnished at the end.
    And we apply three layers due to the fact that there is some sanding (after the layers are completely cured).

    Then, I would like to add: if there is ANY boatbuilding material out there which one could call "easy to handle", it for sure is Epoxy resin. Though that does´nt make it the first choice in every case, of course.

    And before one starts the next round Epoxy vs. Poly (the 587th issue), we produce (our range from 32 to 45meter) in poly / glass too, since 26 month now, so I have some first hand insight to compare.

    Regards
    Richard
     
  12. bntii
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    bntii Senior Member

    We are in different sectors of the industry.

    I do fabrication and repairs/restoration to existing vessels. No new builds.
    In the work I do, field conditions do not allow encapsulation so water may be introduced to bonded sides regardless of coating used.
    What I see in the field is that waterproofing is not the issue- all of the finishes do this if properly applied. What I face is degradation of the applied finish due to UV, poorly maintained boats, poor application- too little finish mostly, and water entering on the back sides/edges where bonded to boat.
    All cases lead to a separation of the finish from the surface followed by wholesale failure. Epoxies in my experience do not improve this outcome.
    Plenty of varnish carefully applied and maintained gives good service.

    In those cases where I am building new teak bits to be bonded to boat- I also seal back surface though am unconvinced that epoxies are necessarily required for effect.

    I don't have a good insight into how new builds are handled so thanks for the information.
    I would be spraying topcoats if doing new builds- is this how you are handling it? Also- are you sending out boats with any of the catalyzed topcoats or using traditional??

    Sort of cheating isn't it?- claiming battles won with bright work in Germany??
    :idea:
     
  13. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Of course we are in two different businesses.
    My recommendation was based on the assumption that we have a new structure to be built here. In that case encapsulating in Ep would make sense. In cases when you are unable to access the "backside" of the wood, Ep is a nono! It would entrap the moisture (as you know).
    On our newbuild boats we are extremely keen to leave not a single square mm without proper resin saturation.
    The UV degradation is a severe issue on clear varnished surface only, there we apply up to 24 layers of 2K PU, ALL UV protectant! Not only resistant!!!
    This could be any conventional varnish too, but the PU stuff is much harder, and we "buff it up" in the final stage.
    I have´nt seen any water intrusion in one of our older boats by so far. (as long as they were serviced and the protection stayed intact)
    But sure some owners drill holes and the like and get you busy, good for you!

    Regards
    Richard
     
  14. bntii
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    bntii Senior Member

    Sounds like a very high build quality. I don't know the product- will research thanks.
    Spray applied?
    Any photos?
     

  15. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Sprayed, yes.

    Look at my Gallery, you´ll see some of the smaller boats.
     
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