Where is this?

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by Wynand N, Apr 22, 2007.

  1. ImaginaryNumber
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 434
    Likes: 58, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 399
    Location: USA

    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Here's another. They are the same thing, almost.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
    Posts: 5,763
    Likes: 349, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 2489
    Location: Quam prospectum!

    hoytedow Helmsman

    Why don't you go outside and take a picture of a place and ask about that? I don't give a flip about Nancy's shavings.
     
  3. Tiny Turnip
    Joined: Mar 2008
    Posts: 750
    Likes: 184, Points: 43, Legacy Rep: 743
    Location: Huddersfield, UK

    Tiny Turnip Senior Member

    They look like bird flights in a flock/murmuration to me.
     
  4. Tiny Turnip
    Joined: Mar 2008
    Posts: 750
    Likes: 184, Points: 43, Legacy Rep: 743
    Location: Huddersfield, UK

    Tiny Turnip Senior Member

    Ok, this small harbour was enlarged from a natural cove in the cliff, by a famous lighthouse engineer. Originally a fishing village, once the harbour works were completed, it was able to export minerals, for which the area is known, until larger, deepwater ports were developed nearby.
     
  5. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
    Posts: 5,763
    Likes: 349, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 2489
    Location: Quam prospectum!

    hoytedow Helmsman

    Minerals. That covers a lot of possibilities.
    Britain has a lot of types of minerals for a small island. I shall sleep on this clue.
     
  6. ImaginaryNumber
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 434
    Likes: 58, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 399
    Location: USA

    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    The second photo is, indeed, a murmuration of starlings. The first photo is of white storks. The photos are a composite of images taken over the course of a few seconds.

    How Xavi Bou Makes His Mesmerizing Portraits of Birds in Flight

    [​IMG]
    Race Pigeons

    [​IMG]
    Sea Gulls
     
  7. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
    Posts: 5,763
    Likes: 349, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 2489
    Location: Quam prospectum!

    hoytedow Helmsman

    Insects are an interesting subject of that technique.
     
  8. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
    Posts: 5,763
    Likes: 349, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 2489
    Location: Quam prospectum!

    hoytedow Helmsman

    I slept on it. No idea.
     
  9. Tiny Turnip
    Joined: Mar 2008
    Posts: 750
    Likes: 184, Points: 43, Legacy Rep: 743
    Location: Huddersfield, UK

    Tiny Turnip Senior Member

    The county's metals have been mined since the bronze age, and the harbour began exporting these, but then it was taken over by a very different mineral used in both medicinal tablets and tableware.
    The lighthouse engineer is best known for an 18th century tower off the shore of the neighbouring county, which was taken down and reconstructed in a major port when the rock on which it stood began to erode.
     
  10. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
    Posts: 5,763
    Likes: 349, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 2489
    Location: Quam prospectum!

    hoytedow Helmsman

    Based on that I would venture a guess. Near Bottalack, Cornwall.
     
  11. ImaginaryNumber
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 434
    Likes: 58, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 399
    Location: USA

    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    You may be referring to Smeaton's Lighthouse, built on Eddystone Rocks, which was moved to Plymouth.
     
  12. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
    Posts: 5,763
    Likes: 349, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 2489
    Location: Quam prospectum!

    hoytedow Helmsman

    I'm thinking St. Ives.
     
  13. ImaginaryNumber
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 434
    Likes: 58, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 399
    Location: USA

    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Hoyt got Cornwall correct, but was on the wrong coast. Snug Charlestown Harbor is on the south coast, west of Plymouth. Copper and clay mines are northwest of Charlestown. The area must be chock full of interesting history! I wonder how hard-rock harbors were constructed before the use of modern equipment?

    A brief history of Charlestown Harbor.

    [​IMG]
     
  14. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
    Posts: 5,763
    Likes: 349, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 2489
    Location: Quam prospectum!

    hoytedow Helmsman

    Last edited: Feb 26, 2021

  15. Tiny Turnip
    Joined: Mar 2008
    Posts: 750
    Likes: 184, Points: 43, Legacy Rep: 743
    Location: Huddersfield, UK

    Tiny Turnip Senior Member

    Congrats IN, yes, Charlestown.
    Hoyt, yes, absolutely, and St Ives is better known as a Smeaton work - the Victorians named the pier/breakwater after him.
    Charlestown may have been his last work, but he was prolific. the Eddystone light (#3) 13 miles odd off Plymouth, is his most famous work, and revolutionised lighthouse building. He was consulted on the disastrous Rye harbour works at Winchelsea (63 years in the building, open for 4 months) but it looks like his recommendations were not carried out. He is credited with 'inventing' the profession of civil engineering. Charlestown may have been his last work.

    Cornwall has a very rich and complex geology ( as a child, I made my parents holiday's a misery by nagging to go visit mining slag heaps to search for specimens) and was important, going back to the bronze age, for tin and copper. The Romans, and I understand the Greeks, had interests in these resources. After sardines, Charlestown was inititally exporting mostly copper. Then the china clay industry (kaolin) around Bugle and St Austell expanded, supplying the raw materials for fine china, medicinal tablets, paint, limewash, rubber, and many other industries. The harbour at Fowey and then Par were improved to allow larger vessels, and Charlestown fell behind. The St Austell deposits are the world's largest source of kaolin, and I remember again as a child, the landmark of 'the Cornish Alps' a group of peaks formed from the deposition of the kaolin extraction, which would light up pink in the light of the setting sun. Sadly, they were regarde as an eyesore, and the tops were scraped off to form rather ugly lumps, which were then seeded to make them ugly fuzzy green lumps. I have other tales too, about the china clay.

    The Charlestown photo was taken in early September, in a brief lockdown window, out for a meal with my brother and sister in law. Charlestown is now a tourist attraction.
     
Loading...
Similar Threads
  1. quickenberger
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    1,587
  2. Rurudyne
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    1,627
  3. AndySGray
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    1,014
  4. Westfield 11
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    1,019
  5. BPL
    Replies:
    29
    Views:
    11,392
  6. brian eiland
    Replies:
    9
    Views:
    1,713
  7. powerabout
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    1,393
  8. mikakun2012
    Replies:
    104
    Views:
    16,465
  9. rawenerg
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    3,086
  10. Guest62110524
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    1,148
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.