Where can I get a long core drill to drill around a steel spike in a floor timber?

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by sdowney717, Nov 12, 2021.

  1. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I'd say that it would need something like a drill press to accurately "core" around the bolt, with the improvised hole saw, it would otherwise "wander"
     
  2. sdowney717
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    Location: Newport News VA

    sdowney717 Senior Member

    Sure, welding something on is fine idea. Been trying to avoid that for now.
    Today I had to have a ganglion cyst on top of my foot surgically removed. I won't be able to do boat work for maybe 2 weeks
     
  3. sdowney717
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    Location: Newport News VA

    sdowney717 Senior Member

    The drift would be the guide. The core drill can cut metal too. It would center around the steel rod. It seems a neat idea. I like best just pulling them.
     
  4. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    waikikin Senior Member

    Welding is one of the ways we use to extract "dumps", threaded rod around 5/8 16mm welded to the top with stick, then a large bearing washer dropped over, a length of pipe then a plate washer on top, well greased "joiner" nuts used to pull up.. mostly get them, a large leather blanket also used in this to guard the surrounds from sparks- hot work always a risk... The other is to use a dump puller which is a large crow bar with a tang welded and heavy D shackle with the pin through the tang to a specific geometry to go over the dump head then when levered down he heavy shackle grips the shaft of the dump and brings it out- probably not suitable in the bilge as more a wharf decking tool- have used them to pull old planking dumps but you need some shank exposed to get the grip.
    Jeff.
     
  5. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    That keel is ready to be replaced. Filling the hole with glued stuff in not a structural repair. The keel is one of the major structural members and needs to be in good condition. All the time spent on patches and wrestling with old corroding drifts, would have been the same as replacing all the timber.
     
  6. sdowney717
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    sdowney717 Senior Member

    Gonzo, I just dont believe you at all. You just dont get it on how this boat is made. Infact your universally negative on everything I do when I post here, yet I have been using this boat for decades, and those drifts not been holding anything for many years as they do nothing.
     
  7. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I do know how to build wooden boats. I have worked for decades as a shipwright. Covering rot with PL glue and sawdust is not a proper repair. It needs to be replaced because it is a structural member. Whether you choose to believe me or not will not change that fact.
     

  8. sdowney717
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    sdowney717 Senior Member

    People like yourself really dont have a clue about maintaining already built real wooden boats. This sub forum ought to be renamed plywood boat repair. Got the same crap about a small deck repair from you.
    My own boat, someone as you would have condemned many decades ago. You get that from people like yourself who say such a boat is dead after 20 years, time for the burn pile. Old wooden boats are not perfect, but mine is overbuilt from perhaps your standard of construction. Like I said few people really know how my own boat was made, but they do pontificate lots. in generalities. There is absolutely nothing wrong with my 2 floor repairs, they are stronger than new construction. And that keel damage is very minor, like a gouge slot in the wood that runs parallel with itself. You may always discount my work but the proof is in the results. That slot is only slightly wider than the 1/2 nch thru hull OEM drilled straight thru the entire keel. Plus there is a very thick wood skeg (keel) bolted directly underneath it.

    I reopened my old thread from 2014 on the woodenboat forum with same info as here, they are certainly well experienced and not getting that kind of crap from any of them about these floor repairs, the keel and these steel drifts. Goto woodenboat forum .com and look in building repair, it is still on the first page. And I also dont always agree with them either. If I followed some of their advice, I would not still have this boat today. IT would have been long gone.
     
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