wheelhouse rebuild, all hardwood -- Help

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by wailingdave, Apr 19, 2012.

  1. wailingdave
    Joined: Mar 2012
    Posts: 9
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Puako, Hawaii

    wailingdave Junior Member

    here is a sketch, wheelhouse is basically 9' X 9'6" with the cabin 7' high
    Hardwood framework with hardwood panel inserts, appears to be the plan , with ample wood on hand for beams and inserts..
    Looking for ideas on the joinery and weatherproofing at seams,joints,windows, doors and attachment areas,, with enough material on hand the inserts could be 3 ply hardwood...
    any input will be greatly appreciated
    plan to attach post to deck with a weld on 3 sided post support that the post could be through bolted to ,, the the post support would be on the inside of the cabin and a continuous weld on mounting rim for the panel insert bottom plate to attach to.. PS,, wheel house is not a part of the engineering of the ships structure,, a new steel deck will be put down for the wheelhouse area and the wheelhouse attached to the new steel deck........ we have ample time material on hand and labor of love to be able to choose this style of construction,, crew prefers to spend their time in a living wheelhouse and wants a change..... Attached Thumbnails
    Mahalo and Aloha wailingDave:cool: (blues power)
     

    Attached Files:

    • scan.jpg
      scan.jpg
      File size:
      190.2 KB
      Views:
      1,058
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 474, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The hardwood uprights, and other structural elements are fine as are the welded attachments. Plywood panels between the uprights is the logical choice and will save some weight. I wouldn't use hardwood for the "inset" panels, but a quality grade of marine plywood, which may very well have hardwoods in them. Okoume and meranti are the typical selections, though any "face" can be had, but the price goes up quickly.

    Joints should be simple and considerate of how the hardwood structural elements will expand and contract. A simple lap joint will hide the end grain, yet offer a place for caulk. You could machine a groove the length of the uprights and slide the panels into these. It really depends on what you want. Will the wheelhouse need to be removed? Will you yank it off in one shot or disassemble? Is weight an issue? what type of weather do you think it'll need to fend off? In the end, think simple and light, as these are the ways you save money, build time and effort. It's really easy to over engineer something like this, making removal or repairs imposable without tearing up stuff.
     
  3. wailingdave
    Joined: Mar 2012
    Posts: 9
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Puako, Hawaii

    wailingdave Junior Member

    The steel wheelhouse will be salvaged, the new wood wheelhouse will be removable,, weight is not an issue,,, money and time are,,,the new wheelhouse will be inserted onto the ship in one piece,,, the ship typ. travels in good weather and not in the stormy part of the world.... just want it to look good and be strong,, Mahalo---WailingDave
     
  4. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Joint movement on varnished timber wheelhouses is an issue.

    Many modern constructions use caulked seams to reduce the maintenance schedule.
     

    Attached Files:

  5. wailingdave
    Joined: Mar 2012
    Posts: 9
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Puako, Hawaii

    wailingdave Junior Member

    Aloha Michael,, and a big Mahalo for the pic's,, I see what you mean,,,, so the joints are finished with a gap for the elastic caulk,, OK can you show me any pic's of a typical joint detail of this type.trying to emagine. lap joint with a gap on the weather side??? Mahalo nue loa WailingDave Ps need anything from Hawaii?
     
  6. HASYB
    Joined: Jun 2011
    Posts: 310
    Likes: 16, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 143
    Location: The Netherlands

    HASYB Senior Member

    Michael, I'm pretty sure the pictures you show are from a alu deckhouse, clad with ply and a thick teak veneer.

    Dave, building wise I'm with Par but would build with double, top marine ply, side- and front panels. Separate round corners. all veneered with 3 to 5 mil. hardwood. no difficult joints, easy construction.

    Cheers,
     

  7. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Yes..I believe that she has an alloy house and a veneered finish.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.