What would this houseboat cost to make sea-worthy...

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by Dustin Nemos, Jan 13, 2019.

  1. Dustin Nemos
    Joined: Jan 2019
    Posts: 4
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: NH, USA

    Dustin Nemos New Member

    [​IMG]

    Not including the internals for living in the home but any ideas on the cost of building something like THIS as a DIY project and getting it sea-ready? What regulations come into play here?

    Thanks, Noobie.

    Dustin
     
  2. JamesG123
    Joined: Mar 2015
    Posts: 464
    Likes: 54, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Columbus, GA

    JamesG123 Senior Member

    Uh... by "seaworthy" do you mean just being able to float right side up? A "vessel" of that shape is never going to have much in the way of propulsion or steerage, so unless its intended as a barge to be pushed around by another boat and/or to be anchored somewhere, you're not likely to find it satisfactory (ie; it won't be able to make progress against wind or current), and authorities might even take exception to it if it becomes a "hazard to navigation".

    These are the relevant USCG regulations. Mind they also don't cover sound design and workmanship when getting approval, more like just what safety equipment you have to have on board.
     
  3. Dustin Nemos
    Joined: Jan 2019
    Posts: 4
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: NH, USA

    Dustin Nemos New Member

    I want all the safety stuff, but primarily this is designed to be docked and lived in and towed, is that a problem? I like the idea of portable homes and I can DIY various things in a typical house, so its the boat and regulatory aspect I don't appreciate it. wanted to make something like above out of possibly long polycarbonate panels.
     
  4. JamesG123
    Joined: Mar 2015
    Posts: 464
    Likes: 54, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Columbus, GA

    JamesG123 Senior Member

    What I see in your drawing is a set of three large cylindrical fluid tanks with windows and doors cut out, bolted together with some kind of central platform between them. From the "fence" between cylinders I would suppose its a "tri-plex" houseboat.

    If it floats is is subject to the above mentioned USCG regulations, but beyond that they are only going to care if you are an obvious menace to anyone but yourself. Local authorities however might object if you are avoiding paying your fair share of their revenues or its an eyesore that scares off those who generate much more in fees and tax payments.
     
  5. BlueBell
    Joined: May 2017
    Posts: 505
    Likes: 41, Points: 28
    Location: Victoria BC Canada

    BlueBell Ahhhhh...

    $20k to $200k USD

    EDIT: There was no mention of scale. Now that I see some size numbers I'm going to revise my answer to your primary question.
    $200k - $2000k USD.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2019
  6. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
    Posts: 1,502
    Likes: 63, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: usa

    fallguy Senior Member

    There are a lot of problems with the design.

    Economically, building round circles is far more expensive than straight lines, so not sure the purpose of round tubes. They shorten window heights and make windows complex, etc. The only gain I see is some idea the barge can travel joined. This wish/idea expands the engineering I'd say (by lots).

    A square structure on top also affords a top deck. Not to mention from an engineering perspective the dwellings could be joined across from each other and intersecting.

    Psychologically, who wants to be in a round tube; it is like an MRI tube. The losses of space inside are huge. Volume square is l.w.h
    Volume cyl is l.pi.r^2
    Same area in space needed so the cylinder here is all lost space.

    Also, you won't be towing that much when joined so not sure the purpose of the triangle configuration when a square offers a fourth dwelling and a nicer courtyard for almost the same ocean footprint.

    The concept is interesting, but I wouldn't want to vacation in them based on their shape and proximity to others.

    Maybe I didn't answer well, but I don't get it.
     
  7. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
    Posts: 2,574
    Likes: 230, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1632
    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    A quick search for a bit of info, maybe it helps to get an informed guess on the technical feasibility, and an estimate for a bare Bermuda type DIY shell price for info on the economical feasibility...

    [​IMG]

    Ventive Floathouse ---> Floathouse¹ ---> type Spar² ---> type Bermuda --> type Island³ --> type Maran ---> bare floathouse shell L 80' × Ø 24' ---> etc..

    [​IMG]

    1 - Floathouse
    [​IMG]

    1 - Floathouse - top floor and dimensions for single family home
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    1 - Floathouse - basement for single family home
    [​IMG]

    2 - type Spar
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    3 - type Island
    [​IMG]

    4 - type Maran
    [​IMG]

    Seasteading ---> Discuss ---> Ventive Seatech

    Reddit ---> Floathouses ---> The Ventive SeaTech Mission ---> Building Blocks of a Floating City
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2019
  8. Dustin Nemos
    Joined: Jan 2019
    Posts: 4
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: NH, USA

    Dustin Nemos New Member

    I liked how it would be immune to giant waves. Just incase, I like secure and durable, These built with poly and aluminum could make for a helluva house for the price.
     
  9. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
    Posts: 2,574
    Likes: 230, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1632
    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    A spar type float house can be made very safe and stable in any kind of seas, see and read about FLIP, when vertical she moves less than 3" up/down in 30' waves, and also hardly moves in any other direction whatever the sea conditions are . . .

    [​IMG]

    FLIP (FLoating Instrument Platform)
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2019
  10. Dustin Nemos
    Joined: Jan 2019
    Posts: 4
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: NH, USA

    Dustin Nemos New Member

    Seems like it might be hard to find a place deep enough to park such a ship as that. I love the idea, its like a Silo
     
  11. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
    Posts: 2,574
    Likes: 230, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1632
    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    E.g. some spots in lake Winnipesaukee in NH with a max depth of 180' would be OK for a 80' spar type float house with a draft of ± 55'~60', but alas only the upper two of the six Ø 24' floors would be able enjoy the magnificent view . . . :(
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2019
  12. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
    Posts: 2,574
    Likes: 230, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1632
    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Cheaper and already feasible, Ha Long Bay, Vietnam...

     

  13. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
    Posts: 2,574
    Likes: 230, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1632
    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    I've added the first above to post #7, so you can easily ask what their price is for one bare shell for a single tube floathouse setup, please let us know their answer . . :)

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Ø 24'​
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2019
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.