what type of fiberglass to use repairing floor in a 1776 ranger super

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by Duck, Aug 12, 2015.

  1. Duck
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    Duck Duck

    I was wondering what type of fiberglass to use i am repairing the floor in a 1776 ranger super a. I would like to know what type of fiberglass, cloth or mat and some type of pant to go over it to make it waterproof. I need to know the names of all supplies. Thanks
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Welcome to the forum.

    What type of "repair" are you performing? Typically you'd use the same (or slightly more) weight fabrics to replace, what you've ground or otherwise removed in the repair process.

    Maybe you can post pictures of what you're doing?
     
  3. Duck
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    Duck Duck

    Patching fiberglass on the deck of the boat
     
  4. Duck
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    Duck Duck

    Is there a paint that I can put over it when I get the patched back and fiberglassed
     
  5. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    You might want to be a bit more specific. A patch could mean you got a ding or two and are doing a simple repair. Then again you could have replaced a large portion of the deck and need to retab things in, apply a sheathing schedule and maybe even some gelcoat too.

    The deck on a boat like your is the areas above the gunnel. The area you stand on in the cockpit for example, is the sole. So are you repairing a deck or something else?

    Again a photo or two would be helpful.

    To answer your question, yes, there's paints of several types, but your boat wouldn't have paint, from the manufacture. Do you want to paint or use gelcoat?
     
  6. Duck
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    Duck Duck

    On the deck there are some places that are soft. I want to cut them out and replace the wood under them. Some of the areas are 14" by 14 ". And some about 4' by 10". About the pant what do you suggest to go over the fiberglass. And what type of fiberglass do I need to use. Another thing I am not sure how to post pic on here.
     
  7. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Again, is this the deck or the cockpit sole?

    If you have soft spots, you should read up on the process, as there's a fair bit of work to it and once you open the sole (my assumption, since the boat has only gunnels and no real deck), typically you'll also find bad stringers, rotten transom core, soaked foam, etc.

    Additionally, you might want to read up on previous threads about sole and stringer replacement.

    [​IMG]

    I haven't seen one of these in years, but the best thing you can do is "de-Ranger" it. This boat has a lot of junk on it, like carpets, cheap hardware, plywood locker and hatch lids and other, "bells and whistles" for the bicentennial edition of this Allison design. It made them heavy and also caused them a host of problems, such as soft soles, water soaked foam and locker lids, etc.

    [​IMG]

    If the sole is soft in some areas, it's very likely just about to get soft nearly every place else, so patching isn't the best option. You'll just being doing it again next year in other areas. You should also check the transom, which is another trouble spot on boats of this vintage and build method.
     
  8. Duck
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    Duck Duck

    Transom seems to be in good shape. The cockpit area Is where the soft spots are. The rest of the boat is in great shape. Where I cut the fiberglass I need to patch it back with fiberglass and I would like to waterproof the top layer of the floor in the cockpit area. But it can be a epoxy paint of gel coat. I am just not sure.
     
  9. ondarvr
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    You don't need to apply a waterproof paint or coating over the repair, although for cosmetic reasons you should. Paints are typically less waterproof than the repair itself, and really offer only UV protection. Epoxy is more waterproof, but still isnt needed as a coating over the repair.

    As PAR said, the soft spots are normally only the tip of the iceberg, a complete inspection of all areas should done before starting any soft spot repairs.
     
  10. Duck
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    Duck Duck

    Yea the repairs that I can visual see might be real bad once I get into it. But the boat was free and I would really like to do something with it. I am going to carpet the cockpit lids and deck. Just need to know what type or kind of fiberglass to use
     
  11. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Little point in tearing up the plywood that is spongy underfoot unless you are prepared to attend to what else could be needing replacement under it. WHich could be extensive. That would be like papering over cracks on a wall.
     
  12. ondarvr
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    Lets look at this a different way. You were just given a car with no brakes and bald tires, and you're asking how to put new seat covers on it so you can take it on the highway.

    People give these old boats away for free all the time, they look at the cost and hassle to make them safe and usable again and decide it's not worth it. The soft spots are the least of your concerns, the potential for a rotten transom and stringers is high, plus waterlogged foam, which means the boat could be very unsafe on the water.

    You can cover the soft spots with a piece of plywood and screw it down, it will be just as good as reglassing the area, and makes more sense if you're not going to do any other work to ensure the boat is safe to use.

    But to actually answer your question, for a simple repair like you're asking about it makes little difference in which type of glass you use, just plain mat will be fine.
     
  13. ondarvr
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    We replied at the same time with about the same thoughts
     
  14. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Carpet is the usual death nail to cockpit soles. It traps moisture under it, unless removed after each use. If you want to do this again, put carpet in.

    As a rule, if a significant portion of the cockpit sole has soft spots, the wise thing is to remove the sole, leaving a perimeter flange, as it'll all be just behind what you're finding in the worst areas. Think of this as changing out a turn signal bulb on your car. You can change out just the one that's bad and move on, but more often than not, you'll be changing the other one in a few months, so many will simply "level the playing field" and change both at the same time. Swapping out a bulb in the car is a pretty simple thing, so if you're ripping up some of the sole, do you really want to do it again in the next year or so?

    Crap, apparently we all tried to post the same type of comments, except I'm too lazy to delete mine.
     

  15. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Your answer is probably the better one, ondarvr ! You are quite right in saying that just overlaying the sole with ply would make as much sense if the rest of it isn't going to be fixed up. And you are wise to emphasise the safety aspects of it.
     
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