what type of cloth keel repair

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by old man, Nov 5, 2009.

  1. old man
    Joined: Mar 2006
    Posts: 21
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: maryland

    old man Junior Member

    I have a shamrock powerboat where the keel ran over something and is damaged. I have the gelcoat grinded off the bottom of the keel (about 1.5" wide) and up both sides about 5" . The edges of the keel are kind of sharp so I know when i lay the cloth its going to not want to lay flat against the sharp bend. I am am also doing this upside down so thats not going to help too much either.

    Is there a way I could spay an adhesive first to get the cloth to hold down flat before i wet it out? What is the best kind of cloth for this type of application? I was going to do multipla layers of cloth, I figured once I get the first layer on and when it cures to the tacky stage I can get the next layer of cloth to stick to that pretty easy it is just getting the first layer to stick.

    Any help is appreciated
    Thanks
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 481, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    First round over the sharp corners, they will prevent full fabric contact, which makes for very weak laminates and bubbles. A few passes with a grinder will do the trick, it doesn't have to be pretty.

    You can use a spray adhesive to hold the cloth overhead until you wet it out with resin, I use 3M super 77. Lightly dust the area with 77 (lightly now) and give it a minute of two to "flash off" then place your first, pre-cut layer of fabric, the stick-um will hold it. Now wet it out, taking care not to apply too much resin and float it off the surface. The same trick applies to resin, you can apply resin, wait until it's tacky then press in your fabric.

    You can apply more fabric if desired or if the next layers are trying to pull the first off the boat (weight) then stop and wait until the first layer is tacky and do it again.

    Another method I've used in this type of "in the field" repair is to make a plastic bag do the deed for me. It's a reverse vacuum bag sort of thing. I'll make a plastic bag from some heavy plastic drop cloth and duct tape, then fill it with air, directly under the work. This mashes the fabric and resin against the hull and holds it there until it's kicked off enough to release the bag pressure. It requires some forethought and planning, but is a way to apply several layers of fabric (which surely will fall off) and smash them in place. 8 to 12 ounce cloth will work, biax would be stronger.
     
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