what to do with the deck.

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by whitepointer23, Dec 30, 2014.

  1. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 490, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Toe rails are an "add on" usually, though your boat could be different. You'll find out as you tear into this old gal. The clamp will be the likely place for fastener rot also around hardware attachments. Just drill out the bad holes, partly fill with straight epoxy and push an appropriately size dowel into the hole. When cured, sand them flush and you've fixed the fastener holes.

    I too like double plywood layers on bigger boat decks. It eliminates the need for butt blocks and other stuff, but fasteners are still a problem. The usual recommendation is at least two layers of fabric over the plywood, after filling and fairing the seams and fastener heads. If the material has a better elongation then regular 'glass cloth, you'll help mitigate print through.
     
  2. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    can you see the 2 plugs in the pic, i am thinking it must have been bolted on later as you say. i only asked about using 1 layer because i thought it would be a lot quicker but i am resigned to the fact that i need to do the best job possible or it will come back to bite me. does print through matter on a non slip deck. i thought the rough finish would cover it. is the sheer clamp the beam that runs fore and aft around the sheer.
     
  3. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    If you needed a one inch thick deck, you could make it up with two layers of half inch.

    Working with thick plywood is difficult...hard to force it to conform to camber and heavy for a man to lift and fit. The two ply also allows you to stagger joints and bury fasteners. Sometimes the two layers works to your advantage at edge transitions that you would like to be waterways. ..

    two ply is a bit more expensive and a bit more work but worth considering
     
  4. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    i understand the process micheal, i was asking what you mean by deck sheer clamp interface.
     
  5. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Deck to hull joint.

    Refitting a deck is a really tedious job. On a new build you just cover the deck beams with a huge sheet of ply then trim off. Your deck is complex because of all the hardware, chainplates, cabin, cockpits, hatches..... it with be fit like a puzzle with many sections. . Even with a template and good measuring there will be plenty of ..OPPS ! poor fits. An advantage to a two ply deck is that poor fits can be corrected on top ply layer
     
  6. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
    Posts: 2,408
    Likes: 160, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 871
    Location: Australia

    waikikin Senior Member

    WP,
    I usually do ply decks in one layer & take the trouble to scarf over the beams with the inside of the scarf landing over the beam- makes it neat & easy to fasten, don't be scared of scarfing ply- just do a couple of practice ones on scrap, a makita electric planer is the go, quite quick too.
    Often but not always the toe rail or spurnwater caps the join between deck/cover board & rubrail/sponson, sometimes it will be set just inboard with fastenings going through into blocking & top edge of sheer plank, there's variations, you will find out!
    Typically when I do a ply deck the glass/dynel will start up the cabin side/coaming & across the deck to a roll over down the outside of the sheer plank, crusher & sponson will then be fixed over the top of the glass... anything that fixes through like the toe rail or beading to the top edge can attract rot to the fastening holes over time- fresh water in- long wet to dry cycle & there you have it... Shipwright makes next mortgage payment;) So try to avoid construction detail that can trap/hold water or at least minimise, there's enough work to do already......

    Jeff.
     
  7. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    I dont like to make a joint on frames. If possible between frames.



    On frame acts as a fulcrum and loads on the scarf.

    [​IMG]
    imagen
     
  8. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
    Posts: 2,408
    Likes: 160, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 871
    Location: Australia

    waikikin Senior Member

    I like to do a scarf on beams, it's glued & a good ratio so irrelevant, I move on & finish the job...
    The scarfed ply gives continuity, the butt between beams only goes from outside of carlin to inside of sheer clamp, not so hot over the blocking or gap if not fitted between sheer clamp & sheer plank.
    Just I like to do it good.

    Jeff.
     
  9. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    thanks jeff. why not leave the toe rail off altogether.
     
  10. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
    Posts: 2,408
    Likes: 160, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 871
    Location: Australia

    waikikin Senior Member

    Plenty of boats do without, there's an option if your stanchion bases have a good bearing area, bracketing can hold a toe rail up 25mm or so from the deck, lets water out everywhere.....
    I haven't seen detail of your stanchion bases, some rely on sitting in the corner.
    They all need to come off to do the deck anyway....
    Jeff.
     
  11. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    I will check next time I go to the boat but I think the staunchions are all bolted to the deck and not connected to the toerail. I just had a good look at my photo and I can see each staunchion has a bolt through the toerail as well. Bugger . I was hoping to ditch it.
     
  12. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 490, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Scarfs over beams are a good solution and they don't get levered open, as the scarfed pieces act as one, continuous hunk of plywood. If the joint fails, the surrounding plywood does as well. It also helps hold the scarf in alignment as it dries.

    Plywood decks really aren't as hard as some are making it sound. You'll have to remove stuff, but this isn't really very difficult, just tedious at times.
     
  13. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    Thanks par. I am not concerned about laying a ply deck . Apart from a ketch having so much gear to remove. But I plan on keeping this boat for a long time so I will have leak free topsides after the jobs done.
     
  14. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    Thanks again Micheal. I am collecting a lot of good info .
     

  15. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
    Posts: 4,519
    Likes: 110, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1009
    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    Apart from a ketch having so much gear to remove. But I plan on keeping this boat for a long time so I will have leak free topsides after the jobs done.

    NOPE!

    Sealants have a service life sometimes fairly long but ALL fail in time.

    It is far easier to accept reality and bed all exterior items with easy to R&R sealant .

    Dolfinite is lots easier to replace than 5200 , with no damage to to your new deck.

    Every 5 to 8 years is time to start re bedding , BEFORE the leaks start and dissolve the woodwork.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.