What stuff or not at all on a lead keel

Discussion in 'Materials' started by TeddyDiver, May 7, 2020.

  1. TeddyDiver
    Joined: Dec 2007
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    Second thoughts about applying antifouling on a lead keel. My plan was to primer with epoxy, apply coppercoat and some soft antifouling on top (the same manner as the hull). The second thought was about lead, does it actually need anything against marine growth or, as I reckon, for the protection of the environment becouse of what it is, lead..
     
  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Lead does not stop marine growth.
     
  3. kapnD
    Joined: Jan 2003
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    kapnD Senior Member

    Whenever I skin dive for dinner, I stuff my pocket with lead from shore casters on the way back to shore.
    Some of it is so covered with marine growth as to only be recognizable by a bit of line hanging from it.
    Incredible that something so toxic to humans could support such proliferous marine life.
    Ok, I know a few humans that seem to thrive on poison too!
     
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  4. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    yet some lead compound pigmented paints, are/were toxic to marine growth ?
     
  5. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Lead oxide was a popular, but toxic white paint pigment years ago, but was replaced by Titanium oxide, which is relatively non-toxic. But I can recall old timers telling me that the white lead paint did not support mouldy mildew growth, which is not the case with white Titania.
     

  6. TeddyDiver
    Joined: Dec 2007
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    So better to stick in the original plan then :) The only thing I've seen without marine growth has been very old car tires. On the new ones made from synthetic rubber seem to atract marine growth but some old ones nothing. Dunno if they are natural rubber or something Germans did during the war. Hope they don't have any nerve gas in their formula :D
     
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