What metric scales used most commonly in yacht design

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Grant Nelson, May 7, 2008.

  1. Grant Nelson
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    Grant Nelson Senior Member

    Silly question, but I am curious.
    Typical architecture scales, in metric, are:
    1:1
    1:2
    1:5
    1:10
    1:20
    1:25
    1:50
    1:100

    There is quite a gap between 1:25 and 1:50.

    Engineering scales fill this gap:
    1:20, 1:30 or 1:33 1/3, 1:40, 1:50, 1:100

    What do the pro's out there in Metric world find most useful? Is there any reason not to use what scale fits your paper and viewing pleasure best, for example scales that builders prefer?
     
  2. masalai
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    Location: cruising, Australia

    masalai masalai

    Huh?
    If you are using paper, I would agree. - - in CAD it is usually 1:1 and utilise digital capacity to redraw at ANY scale by zooming in or out to see what you need to see in the appropriate precision. A good cad package should also allow you to "switch off" parts so that you work only with the desired object....

    Metric is International, is decimal in structure and volume relates to lxbxh and weights and a lot of other inter-relationships are soooo much easier....

    (just a fool making an observation)
     
  3. CTMD
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    CTMD Naval Architect

    Your "Typical architecture list" covers most of what I use. Insert 1:30 to make the gap a little smaller.

    Yes I select from the list based upon what fits the paper best or the level of detail required. Most builders don't give a **** about scale, they never read the drawings anyway......

    Actually they tend to prefer scales that they can measure with a normal metric ruler or tape measure and then do easy maths in their heads. So from your list: 1:1, 1:2, 1:10, 1 :20, 1:100. The trick is on a good set of drawings they won't need to measure anything as everything important will be dimensioned. Measuring off drawings should be discouraged as paper is very dimensionally unstable.

    The other trick is builders tend to prefer all drawings be layed out in landscape. This makes them easier to use on benches particularly if they staple them all together.
     
  4. Landlubber
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    Most builders don't give a **** about scale, they never read the drawings anyway......

    Maybe we would if they were correct, I have yet to see a set of drawing that have sections, profiles and GA all the same, we usually find something is offset to one dwaring to the other.

    This is definately not a reflection on you Chris, I have never used any of your work, it is a general statement, but real, i am working now with very well known designers, and the plans are simply wrong.

    "a good set of drawings they won't need to measure anything as everything important will be dimensioned"........true, sounds like you may be the exception to the above, but really, have you ever designed a final set of plans that were perfect?.....or maybe the builders do not bother to advise, we are so used to correcting things that it is just "normal" to do so.
     
  5. CTMD
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    CTMD Naval Architect

    Its a scary trend but I've found that the better known a "designer" is the more mistakes there are. This is because well known designers usually have larger teams working for them developing drawings simultaneously. While there are always checks performed they invariably miss something. If you buy a set of drawings of a one man band (that rules me out, you'll have to go to someone else), there will be fewer of these errors.

    Of course I've issued drawings with small errors on them, however, if these errors cause genuine problems, I'm more than happy to help pay for the fixes. Because as a builder you should be able to trust the drawings you have been provided.
     
  6. Landlubber
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    Thanks Chris for the reply, yes you should be able to trust the designer, but no so in the real world unfortunately. Such is life.

    Nice to see someone really does care about his work though, all the best.
     

  7. Grant Nelson
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    Grant Nelson Senior Member

    Thanks for the discussion all... while I like to draw on paper, I was actually thinking about the scales I would print from. Seems giving the dimensions is best however. And after completing my most complete drawing so far, I can appreciate how hard it is to get everything to line up in all three view - in particular when you are making changes - you just forget sometimes. 3d programs help - make a part in 3d, export it to, for example, a dwg file with all three views, and then you can fit the whole unit carefully, and not each line.
     
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