what kinda paint do i need?

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by tmcustoms, May 30, 2008.

  1. tmcustoms
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: sacramento ca

    tmcustoms Junior Member

    I wanna repaint my 12' tri hull fishing boat its now just gel coat and i would like to paint it with a very tough paint in a greyish blue color i was looking at the interlux line of product but could not figure out what kind of paint to use any help thanks
     
  2. Meanz Beanz
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Meanz Beanz Boom Doom Gloom Boom

    Brush or spray?
     
  3. Landlubber
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    Two pack polyurethanes.

    Easy to apply and dries as hard as a rock, if you want a pretty finish it is 99% base work preparation, if you don't care, well, either do I.
     
  4. tmcustoms
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    tmcustoms Junior Member

    brush roller if i use interlux brand what kind do i need
     
  5. Meanz Beanz
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    Meanz Beanz Boom Doom Gloom Boom

  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    If you don't have a fair amount of painting experience, then use Brightside one part polyurethane. Two part paints require a reasonable amount of skill to apply well and can be tricky for someone with limited painting experience. It's also a good deal cheaper to use the single part paints.

    This said, the really tough paints are two part polyurethanes, with their related special primers, reducers, etc. You need much more then just paint with these products, but the results can be stunning, easily showing how good (or bad) your surface prep was.

    Surface prep is the name of the game (90%). If you aren't familiar with a long board and wet sanding with grits finer then found on a match book cover, then stick with the one part parts.
     
  7. tmcustoms
    Joined: May 2008
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    tmcustoms Junior Member

    I am just looking for something really tough i have used the brightside and dont really think its tough enough for a boat on and off a tralier 4x a week i think ill give the 2 part a shot
     
  8. the1much
    Joined: Jul 2007
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    Location: maine

    the1much hippie dreams

    sorry manz,,,,on and off that many times,,your not gonna find ANY paint stand up to that longer then a year.
     
  9. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Change your loading techniques and float her on, instead of powering her up the bunks. This will save your paint job. Carpeted bunks can eat the paint off of anything in pretty short order. Also some high density plastic runners on the bunks can help a little too.
     
  10. kengrome
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    kengrome Senior Member

    Or you could use plain old household porch and floor enamel with aluminum powder mixed into it. Those aluminum particles are very abrasion resistant.
     
  11. TollyWally
    Joined: Mar 2005
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    TollyWally Senior Member

    "Or you could use plain old household porch and floor enamel with aluminum powder mixed into it. Those aluminum particles are very abrasion resistant."

    More details please :)
     
  12. kengrome
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    kengrome Senior Member

    Buy high quality porch and floor paint. Buy aluminum powder. Stir paint thoroughly. Put 20% by volume aluminum powder into the paint, or more or less to suit your preferences. Mix thoroughly again, and keep mixing while painting if the aluminum powder tends to settle -- which it will unless the paint you buy is that new thick gel-type paint. Roll it on. When it's dry roll on another coat. When that's dry roll on a third coat if you feel like it, or if the aluminum is still not distributed evenly on the surface.

    A better approach if your boat is upside down is to roll the paint on smoothly without any aluminum in it. Work in small areas. When you're satisfied with the smoothness of the paint you've applied, sprinkle the aluminum powder all over the wet paint and totally cover it. Do not 'press it in' or you'll smear it, just sprinkle it on then leave that area alone as you move on to the next section. When the paint has dried, use a spare dry paint brush or whisk broom or perhaps a scrub brush to remove all the aluminum powder that's not stuck to the paint. Then put another coat or two of paint over it and you're done.
     
  13. tmcustoms
    Joined: May 2008
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    tmcustoms Junior Member

    WELL I BOUGHT THE 2 PART INTERLUX PERFECTION I NOW HAVE 2 COATS OF PRIMER AND AM WET SANDING FOR THE THIRD I THINK ILL TRY THE ALUM IN THE PAINT FOR THE BOTTOM i MAY ALSO USE SOME HARD PLASTIC ON THE RUNNERS I ALWAYS FLOAT THE BOAT ON SO MABEY IT WONT BE SO BAD WELL SEE WEN IM DONE ILL POST SOME PIC FOR YOU GUYS TO SEE HOW SHE COME OUT THANKS FOR ALL THE HELP GUYS
     
  14. Eralnd44
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    Location: Eurohut

    Eralnd44 Wanderer

    Just what makes the aluminum a wear resisting additive? Isn't that a very soft metal? Perhaps it is more like aluminum oxide, which is similar to corundum?

    Does the hull show silver streaks when the top layer of paint is worn away?
     

  15. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I wouldn't add aluminum powder or aluminum oxide to the paint. Graphite maybe, but any particulate mixed with the paint will limit adhesion.

    Don't bother screwing around with a "custom" home brew. Use sacrificial rub strips, which can be easily replaced when damaged or worn down, saving the paint.
     
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