What kind of wood is on my deck trim?

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Chris ellison, Apr 26, 2016.

  1. Chris ellison
    Joined: Apr 2016
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    Location: Port Stanley, ontario

    Chris ellison New Member

    What kind of wood is on the deck trim?

    I have a 1974 Morgan out Island 28.

    I'm trying to re-stained trim on the deck. But I am not certain what kind of wood it is... Or the best way to stain it.

    Any ideas or suggestions?

    Thanks.

    Chris
    Canquest@execulink.com
    519-857-2119
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  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Welcome to the forum.

    It's probably teak, though that era Morgan was built pretty cheaply, so who knows. Teak is the logical choice and pretty easy to identify, can you post a picture?

    Generally you don't stain it, but clear coat it with oil , varnish or polyurethane.
     
  3. Chris ellison
    Joined: Apr 2016
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    Chris ellison New Member

    Teak or mahogany

    I have tried to attach a pic.
     

    Attached Files:

  4. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    It looks like teak. There are products like Cetol that are easy to apply but cover the grain. The best finish is not by staining by varnishing. It allows the grain to show through. The first step is to remove all the old finish. You can use paint stripper or scrape it off.
     
  5. Chris ellison
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    Chris ellison New Member

    Here is another shot of my wood...

    Teak or mahogany?
     

    Attached Files:


  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    That's teak and pretty low grade stuff, by the looks of it, likely farm raised. Once it's weathered, it's difficult to get it to look good again, without aggressive resurfacing. I find it best to scrape the surface on the last, finest grits, so the subsequent coatings (whatever they may be) can really get a good grip and also, just prior to recoating a solvent scrub, with 50/50 acetone/toluene.
     
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