What kind of ride/efficiency would she have?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Tinklespout, Oct 27, 2013.

  1. Tinklespout
    Joined: Oct 2012
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    Tinklespout Junior Member

    I'm hoping you smart fellows can tell me what kind of performance I might expect from a hull like this. It is 23 feet long, 6 feet wide in the middle, about 4 feet wide at the transom, made in Mexico and registered (in Mexico) as a Panga. I was surprised when I didn't see a flat pad at the transom like most Pangas.

    Anyone seen a "sailboat like" panga before?

    Thanks,

    Kim
     

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  2. Tinklespout
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    Tinklespout Junior Member

    Another picture

    Can only seem to post one picture per post?
    Kim
     

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  3. Tinklespout
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    Tinklespout Junior Member

    Another picture

    One more
     

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  4. Tinklespout
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    Tinklespout Junior Member

    Another picture

    Last one.
     

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  5. Tinklespout
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    Tinklespout Junior Member

    One more picture

    Here is a picture that I missed.
     

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  6. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Looks good. Long and thin, round chines. Its not designed to be a fast boat...but it will push thru a choppy sea very well and be quite when fishing

    Looks like a Jamaican canoe..seawothy boat
     
  7. philSweet
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    philSweet Senior Member

    Yup, designed for modest power and speed and low-cost fitout. It wouldn't be unusual to see a tiller-steered 100hp outboard on one. So handling is probably very predictable. My buddy was amazed when he went on a penguin tour in Chile. The panga had twin 100's tiller steered by one guy as he gave the tour presentation. The helmsman got knocked clean out of the boat by a porpoising penguin; and my buddy had to bring the boat around and collect him and get him to the hospital. One damn lucky guide to have a guest find him and pluck him out of a 40 degree ocean alive. Nobody saw him go overboard, the motors just slowly started to back off and suddenly they realized they'd lost their guide.:eek:
     
  8. tom28571
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    tom28571 Senior Member

    Ditto Michael's and Phil's comments althugh sticking a big motor on pangas seem fairly common. Without the common planing wings aft, it will not plane efficiently but that does not seem to stop them trying.
     
  9. Chuck Losness
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    Chuck Losness Senior Member

    What you have is one of the very early style panga's. They were made for low hp outboards in the 10hp to 25hp range. I have seen them so loaded down with fish that the gunnels were almost awash. Yet they seemed to just chug along never shipping a sea over the side even in bad weather and nasty seas, You might try contacting Neil Storer (sp??) at Marina de La Paz. His dad is credited with designing and making the early panga's and the more recent versions. I am sure that Neil or his dad can give accurate information on your boat.
     
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  10. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Ditto most of the comments. It hasn't any real bearing area aft, so she'll be relegated to displacement and low semi displacement speeds, though she should be reasonably economical. Without rebuilding the whole back half of the boat, she'll never plane.

    Performance expectations would be up to 7 MPH with modest HP requirements. If you accepted 6 MPH as your cruising speed, you could get by with a 10 HP outboard, though this wouldn't have a lot of reserve punch for chop, so a 15 HP would be all you'd need. You could toss a couple of hundred HP at this boat and maybe get her into the low teens, though her bow will be pointing skyward.
     
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  11. Tinklespout
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    Tinklespout Junior Member

    Thanks

    I really appreciate the info. I was kind of expecting to hear what you said Par. I was hoping to hear a bit higher numbers on the speed but am really fortunate that you informed me as I need more speed than that. Sure is a nice looking boat though.

    Thanks again!!
     
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  12. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Well you could install a set of "wings" on her quarters, which would offer some effective planing surface, but you still have a built down hull, with it's associated drag. You could develop a set of wings that would work though you'll need a whole lot more then just a 15 HP outboard to get her over the hump and scooting along. You'll need to generate enough power to get her over 12 MPH to be fully up on plane and you'll need enough reserve HP to keep her there when encountering waves, chop wind and currents. This likely means a 60 - 75 HP outboard, to offer this level of reserve, which is to say a bit more costly to own and operate then a 15 HP. With this HP and some well shaped wings, you might see 16 MPH and several times the fuel consumption of the 15 HP outboard.
     
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