What kind of hull is this?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Pengyou, Apr 26, 2019.

  1. Pengyou
    Joined: Feb 2018
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    Pengyou Junior Member

    [​IMG]It looks like a flatbottom merged with two pontoons. What specific water conditions is it most useful for?
     
  2. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    It is a planing catamaran, suited to sheltered waters only.
     
  3. BlueBell
    Joined: May 2017
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    BlueBell Ahhhhh...

    "What kind of hull is this?"

    It's a pretend hull.
     
  4. JSL
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    JSL Senior Member

    If the 'wet deck' is not immersed then you could??? call it a catamaran. Otherwise, I would describe it as a 'sponsoned barge'.
    Depending on size and speed, okay (maybe)?? for calm water ( 3" waves) but could have a 'sneezing' problem. Might be good for Lakes, canals, sloughs, etc
     
  5. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    It's what Destination Yachts call their V-Series full hull, maybe a kinda wide split "V" or a kinda wide spread "W" that is, it seems to be floating on its full hull width including the raised mid section of the bottom, it looks like for flat water use only to me, don't see the benefits of that hull form for its intended use, which they explain as follows . . .

    ‘‘ Our V-Series is a custom, full hull, houseboat line. It also features the safety of the twin, compartmented hull, with the design and storage of a full hull. This is a “Design Protected” feature and is not offered by any other houseboat manufacturer. ’’

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2019
  6. Rurudyne
    Joined: Mar 2014
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    Rurudyne Senior Member

    I've seen pictures of large river boats that are sorta-but-not-catamarans like that. I've wondered about the benefits too.

    My guess: in this case the benefit is in marketing. It looks different (and they don't seem to be promising anything specific when I glanced at your link) so it's a feature.

    That or they need to get boats under a bridge to deliver them and this hull form helps them squeeze bigger boats under it with the deeper bits of the hull on either side of the semi-truck's trailer.
     
  7. JSL
    Joined: Nov 2012
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    JSL Senior Member

    Still essentially a 'barge' hull form. Works okay for slow speed (about 8-10 kn.) which is all you need for a houseboat (self-propelled float-home) like this.
     
  8. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    The benefit is beachability without hard grounding friends. The two deeper cat sections hit the beach first, and thus create a situation where the entire vessel does not ride up onto the shore which would require more reverse to overcome the frictional drag of land.

    The vessel is also prone to side slipping in high winds and the cat hulls help a bit with that. Of course these are dangerous in much of any winds.

    I really love houseboats and go on a trip every other year on one.
     
  9. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    The claim at the specs section is ‘‘World’s Safest Hull’’ without any suitable waters specified.

    The main level plan shows 4 jet skis on ramps on the swim platform.

    [​IMG]

    In the cropped enlarged part with the outdrive leg I've added an estimated ± waterline based on the pictures which are showing the swim platform.

    Destination Yachts V Series full hull outdrive leg and added estimated waterline.jpg

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  10. JSL
    Joined: Nov 2012
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    JSL Senior Member

    This is a houseboat, not a boat (boats have deck plans, not floor plans). It probably does the job well in calm waters and you are not going to 'go to sea'.
     
  11. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Good point, also this way only the bottoms of the deeper cat sections need to be strong enough for grounding.
     
  12. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    The lines aft suggest an intent to plane, if just to potter around slowly, they'd be better to sweep up at the stern. Given the low or non-existent clearance, and especially forward, it would be wet and slam.
     
  13. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Yes, the cat hulls even can have a wear plate over the keel. Or perhaps that is done after several seasons of hard use. The customer pays for all fuel, so a wear plate that damages all that we know about streamlining hulls is not an issue.

    As for the safest boat, that is marketing burp. The charter operator I have rented from (various) won't let the boats leave the dock in 15 knot winds and will call you in early if the weather is expected bad the day of your scheduled return.

    They do fine in a head or tailwind, but oftentimes, they are towing or have another boat on the hip amd things get difficult on a windy reach.

    Not a Gulf Coast crosser. Ain't saying you can't, just ought not.
     
  14. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    They don't plane. The helm is always inside or on the roof, so wet is little concern.

    They do slam, but like I said earlier, the wind restrictions limit it occurring.
     

  15. Angélique
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    I think that leaves one Mr. E's points (as I understand it) still standing, what is the use of the slanted outside bottom sides for a houseboat that's just pottering around, or it's like Fallguy expects, that it might be meant to slide sideways in a bit of wind rather than trip over a single hard chine, what are the ideas here that it might work that way . . ?
    P.S.
    Note in this regard that the total draft is for more than half for the almost vertical part of the outside hull top sides, and less than half of the draft is for the slanted ½ V part of the outside bottom sides.

    Destination Yachts V Series full hull outdrive leg and added estimated waterline.jpg
    (estimated waterline info in post #9)
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2019
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