what is the meaning of “Phase of crest relative to origin: 20.0 degrees (4.44 M.)” ?

Discussion in 'Stability' started by sun, Oct 20, 2021.

  1. sun
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    sun Junior Member

    Thanks for your answer!
     
  2. Ike
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    Ike Senior Member

    Not sure of what you are asking. If you have a wave train all the waves are reaching the crest and the trough at the same time, thus in phase. However if you introduce another wave in which the crest is reached at a different moment than the first wave, then they are out of phase. In phase waves can reinforce each other an create a much higher wave, that is greater amplitude. Two wave of the same amplitude, 18o degrees out of phase will cancel each other. I haven't even mentioned waves that interact at an angle, only waves that are either traveling the same direction or 180 degrees to each other. A wave that is 20 degrees different than another would see some interesting results. But I'm not sure what they mean "point of origin" I am assuming they mean where the wave was generated, but it doesn't explain how or what generated the wave.
     
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  3. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    As Ike notes, your query is clear as mud.

    However, are you referring to this:

    upload_2021-10-25_8-6-8.png
     
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  4. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I've seen that value before. Is it different as the density of water changes? For example with salinity and temperature?
     
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  5. sun
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    sun Junior Member

    It is different as the angle of wave.
     
  6. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I don't understand. What is the change correlation?
     
  7. sun
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    sun Junior Member

    Thanks for your help,“4.44 M” is wave height.
     
  8. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Do you mean the height of the wake?
     

  9. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Is this wave height:
    significant,
    mean,
    maximum,
    most probable... etc etc ??

    Just a number without qualification does not help anyone.
     
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