What is the easiest way to satisfy this fire extinguishing requirement?

Discussion in 'Class Societies' started by ldigas, Jan 17, 2012.

  1. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    Bon voyage!
     
  2. lfreddecolo
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    lfreddecolo New Member

    There are only a few compounds that will readily break apart and recombine in this way -- the various atoms must be attracted to one another in the right manner. For example, when you boil water, it takes the gaseous form of steam, but this gas doesn't react with oxygen in the air. There isn't a strong enough attraction between the two hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom in a water molecule and the two oxygen atoms in an oxygen molecule, so the water compound doesn't break apart and recombine.
     
  3. mydauphin
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    mydauphin Senior Member

    Might be cheaper to install and automatic self contained halon gas system.
     
  4. ldigas
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    ldigas Senior Member

    They're still having a problem with this (thankfully, they're not in a hurry ... till summer). The problem is the engine room is some 3m by 4m by 1,5m, and there is very little room inside (inside are already the main engine, diesel generator, two fuel tanks, one ... uhmm, black tank - for toilet and so on, batteries ...)

    It can be accessed from the hatch on the top, and from the side (below the stairs, which can be lifted up), and there isn't really much room inside for the man to move.

    So they're currently discussing with the class society whether they could put a few (really big ! :) fire extinguishing bottles to get over that.

    I mean, I understand the requirement issue, but practicallity sometimes just puts a "different set of requirements" on you ...
     
  5. ldigas
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    ldigas Senior Member

    How does that look like? Do you have a link where it can be seen (at least, informational) and a price maybe (ballpark figure)?
     
  6. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    from my experience with house building inspectors I'd say

    you are 1000% correct to just ASK THE INSPECTOR.

    9 out 10 times they will be happy to tell you exactly what they want to see, BEFORE HAND.

    Never try to 'out smart' the inspector and ram something down his throat. Only a tiny number of contractors are qualified and able to do that.

    My inspection agencies will say "we don't do 'courtesy inspections'" in that they don't come out for free for a 'look see' to advise you.

    But most do a 'no charge follow up' if you "fail" the first one....so I'd often schedule an inspection before we were even 1/2 ready just to ask questions and resolve issues and never had a problem.

    I've seen a lot of very smart, honest and competent contractors 'beat themselves up' getting into a pride-fueled 'war' with the inspector.


    Don't be afraid to even present the issue to neighboring inspectors if possible. You will often get lots of additional free pointers as to what 'flies'.

    I'd say every 5 minutes I've spent gathering info from inspectors PRIOR to presenting physical items for actual inspection has made me $500 on average.

    Don't forget to ask the inspector questions during current inspection about what he needs to see for next inspection.
     
  7. die_dunkelheit
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    die_dunkelheit NA Student

    Wouldn't halon in a boat be the worst thing you could do? I mean, sure it'd be fantastic at putting the fire out because the hull would contain all the halon and smother the flames. But the hull would still contain all the halon after the fire is gone and it would be very dangerous for people because it would smother them too. Inhale too much and you literally can't cough it back out because it's too heavy. (This came from a good friend who was the Battalion Commander of a fire district before he passed, so he knew what he was talking about on the subject..) You'd have to have some incredible ventilation to not kill yourself.
    Do I have something wrong or did I miss something?

    A little more constructive input, I'm siding with Squidly-Diddly about asking the inspector. It doesn't matter that you don't know the guy as you pointed out earlier, he's practically in the business of telling what you did wrong, not just the fact that it's wrong.
     
  8. mydauphin
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    mydauphin Senior Member

    I have halon only in engine room, and it honks three times before it goes, but after goes off you better hope you're not in there.
     
  9. die_dunkelheit
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    die_dunkelheit NA Student

    Okay, that makes perfect sense..
     
  10. mydauphin
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    mydauphin Senior Member

    Was thinking of doing to the whole boat as kind of a anti-piracy thing, but what if system went of in the middle of the night.
     
  11. taniwha
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    taniwha Senior Member

    why do you need to comply with GL, will the boat be used commercially? Otherwise ISO 9094-2 applies.
     
  12. ldigas
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    ldigas Senior Member

    Because my class society (CRS, Croatian Register of Shipping) has since a few years ago rewritten its Yachts rules, that they're practically nothing but references to ISO rules, which most people don't have (I don't, at least).

    I called them and asked them, and they said it is fine if I use the GL rules, and then they will make notes about the differences.

    They asked for "structural fire protection" (literal as I could make it translation from Croatian to English ...) and that it has to satisfy either BONPET or (some other standard).
     
  13. taniwha
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    taniwha Senior Member

    http://www.iso.org/iso/search.htm?qt=9094&searchSubmit=Search&sort=rel&type=simple&published=on this is what is used worldwide for every craft under CE marking, I would stick to this
     

  14. ldigas
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    ldigas Senior Member

    Thanks taniwha. I'm aware of what ISO rules apply, but as I was saying, ... my home class. society has since a few years ago rewritten its (rules which apply to what I'm doing right now), and now they're mostly references to ISO rules, which come in some 25 books, which I don't have available. Nor the means to buy right now.

    That's why I'm using the clause to go under GL rules, and then ask them to re-evaluate it as they see fit.
     
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