What is the best paint for a steel sailboat

Discussion in 'Metal Boat Building' started by theboilerflue, Oct 29, 2007.

  1. theboilerflue
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    theboilerflue Junior Member

    I'm building a 36' steel sailboat and would like some recommendations on which paint to use. I would like a paint that is readily available and has some ease of application.
     
  2. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    A two part, linear polyurethane would be the best though application ease isn't a selling point. In that vain a single part polyurethane would be my second choice, followed by an epoxy/enamel morph. The two part paints, especially sprayed look like tinted glass and are hard as rock. The singles not quite as hard, but application is easier.
     
  3. theboilerflue
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    theboilerflue Junior Member

    As far as ease of use I simply meant that one could sand, clean and re-apply, to fix a scratch with out having to blast down to bare metal completely or having to use some sort of paint stripper ect. What I think would be more important would be that the paint be available in most locations.
     
  4. theboilerflue
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    theboilerflue Junior Member

    Also any specific brands that you have had success with in the past
     
  5. Landlubber
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    I have had very good success with Altex/Devoe (Devoe Ameron now) range of products.

    They have two pack systems designed specifically for industrial use in agressive environments (the sea), and when their products are applied, I finish off with Awlgrip/Awlcraft for luxury finish or just use their own finishing products for general marine use.

    I have used these products for over twenty years, with never a failure, but I do make sure that I never skimp on thickness application.

    It is very important to sand blast Swedish Standard 2.5 (clean shiny metal) before application, and also use pre galvanised plates for construction if possible, it makes the job a whole lot easier.

    They are available in many countries, and are consistant in spec. There will be a dealer for sure in Canada.

    As PAR says, linear urethanes ate the best for quality looking top coats, but it is the base coats that really matter.

    Avoid the "new" water based magic products, tried and proven is what is required with steel protective coatings.
     
  6. mastcolin
    Joined: Jun 2005
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    mastcolin Senior Member

    Do you really want a top class shiny, smooth paint job to finish or are you less fussed?

    Anything that will give you a what I would consider a "yacht" finish involves more labour(sanding) and more cost in material.

    Cruise liners look shiny enough and they aren't sanded or use 'yacht' materials. You pay your money and make your choice as they say.

    Stick with marine paints whatever you do. Plenty industrial materials eg paints for steel on land will do the job in a lot of cases but if they go wrong the supplier will wash hands of helping you.

    I'm with author who said the blasting is most important. He mentioned galvanised - I presume he means "shop-primed"? Galvanised isn't good idea for welding or for underwater use(the zinc will rapidly dissolve).

    A lot of shop primers will take overcoating without reblast, just a good mechanical clean.

    International do range of materials for commercial/low cost yachts finishing.

    Just spray on (by airless ideally - less coats) or roller.

    They do a polyurethane called Interthane 990 which is reasonable gloss but wide long overcoat window. Gloss retention is fair.

    If money is object, don't skimp on epoxy primers. You can always apply a cheap 1 pack topcoat then remove back to primer later and apply a high grade polyurethane.

    In fact, you could apply the 2 pack Interthane 990 over the one pack product, Interlac 665 after a year or so no problem.

    Don't skimp on the research time.
    Work out your coating budget.
    Don't forget the waste factor (budget at least 10% and more if you spray) Don't forget the interior...which will be 2X area on outside due to all the frames/stringers etc.
    Don't forget tanks (potable, black, grey)
    Are you going to employ applicator? Do you realise how much he will be?
    Where are you hoping to paint? Shed? Outdoors? In the cold and damp?

    I used to work for International Paint in UK. They would happily spec up a variety of systems ie volumes and prices for you if you send in dimensions. I suggest you contact them and any other local supplier (Jotun? Hempel?)

    In answer to your specific example; no system wil require you to remove paint beyond a scratch. ie if you scratch only the topcoat, you'd sand the scratch, fill as required then prime to seal filler and topcoat. If you scratch to steel, you just feather out and replace the original primer then re-topcoat. Unfortunately a repair is always going to be slightly visible unless you use a polishable topcoat..and even then if original colour is aged you may still see it.

    Good luck
     
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  7. Landlubber
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    Yeah Colin, I should have said shop primed, galvanised is just an expression, not in fact hot dipped zinc.
    Ta.
     
  8. theboilerflue
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    theboilerflue Junior Member

    I don't really care what it looks like very much as long as it protects well and is not too expensive. I'll be painting in a closed shed that'll be heated so hopefully moisture will not be a problem even thought it'll be winter.
     
  9. whatever
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    whatever New Member

    Painting an old steel hull

    I too have had good results with Devoe Products on a steel hull. The paint system is user friendly and I have found the paint in some remote locations as well.

    I am just tucking into my own hull restoration, the 2nd time around and have some questions about prep. I am not in a position to sand blast the hull of my 42 Colvin ketch at this time. I have been told that each round of blasting will remove some metal thickness. I last blasted 12 years ago.

    I am wondering if any one has experience or thoughts about
    wire cup brushing below the waterline, welding patches over the thin spots I can not get to from the inside for replating, replating where I can and applying Ameron 167 closely following the cup brushing, then Ameron 235 as a base coat. Any comments??

    How about soda blasting for below waterline paint removal?

    My sailboat is coming on 30 years old and I have had to patch her up a bit already .

    I'm finding supplies expensive in NZ any suggestions where I can source paint and brushes, tape, for a big project?
     
  10. Landlubber
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    Try BLA in NZ. They are wholesale distributors, based in Brisbane but all over Australia and NZ now too. www.bla.com.au
     

  11. Brent Swain
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Brent Swain Member

    Over 30 years cruising steel boats has convinced me that coal tar epoxy is best for most of a steel boat inside and out.
    Friends have had excellent results with International Inerprotect 2000E below the waterline.An epoxy antifouling over that should work well.
    Brent
     
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