What happened to passenger hovercraft? BBC text story

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by DCockey, Nov 9, 2015.

  1. BMcF
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    BMcF Senior Member

    I have opinions on that based on a fair amount of direct experience under way testing various hydrofoils. The situation where the seas cause a "knock down" or otherwise force a hydrofoil to go hull-borne, inevitably involves seas so high (relative to vessel size) that the resulting hullborne motions are very high; a truly miserable experience for passengers. The foils are certainly providing some passive damping under those conditions, but the effects are "lost in the noise" and hence largely irrelevant.

    Condor's Rodriguez hydrofoil ferry was a good example; despite having some very skilled skippers, there were occasions when the vessel would become over-matched enroute across the channel or between islands and forced to operate hull borne. Never a pleasant situation for the passengers on board.
     
  2. BMcF
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    BMcF Senior Member

    We do?

    ;)
     
  3. Leo Lazauskas
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    Leo Lazauskas Senior Member

    IMO, the only way for there to be a market for a large fleet of big SES (or ACV)
    would be if a volcanic eruption (e.g. Laki or some other Icelandic nasty?)
    rendered air flight impossible for a long time.
     
  4. daiquiri
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    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    Leo, you seem to be ready to take over the leadership of Spectre. :p
     
  5. BMcF
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    BMcF Senior Member

    OK. I mean, I've been waiting this long....
     
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  6. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    :eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek:
     
  7. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    I can testify to that, and on more than one occasion too :eek:
     
  8. BMcF
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    BMcF Senior Member

    Lionel sure did push his boats and their captains back in the day. ;)
     
  9. Leo Lazauskas
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    Leo Lazauskas Senior Member

    It's time to get a real job now that I've turned 60. And I've been watching
    volcanoes for many years, so it's a natural for me. :)

    But seriously, if there was another "Year Without Summer", or if trans-Atlantic
    and trans-Pacific flights were not possible for a couple of years or more, what
    alternatives are there that could replace airplanes?
     
  10. daiquiri
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    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    For example, with the same total power as that Japanese TSL, a cargo submarine of the same length could probably carry at least 10 times higher useful load at 30-32 kt. Which gives like 10 times higher transport factor TF = (Wcargo x Speed) / Power.
     
  11. Leo Lazauskas
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    Leo Lazauskas Senior Member

    There are no shortage of alternatives for slow/medium transport. Apart from
    SES/ACV there's nothing I can see that could handle 75 -100 knots.
    Maybe dirigibles would become viable.
     
  12. BMcF
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    BMcF Senior Member

    SES sea trains....that's what we need. :D
     
  13. Marmoset
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    Marmoset Senior Member

    yeah! ever ride on one! loud!!! cant see a thing over the spray either!

    Barry
     
  14. BMcF
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    BMcF Senior Member

    I even had one we operated out of our company compound for a while....an SH-2 that sounded like a flock of helicopters when it was operating. ;)
     

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  15. Leo Lazauskas
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    Leo Lazauskas Senior Member

    Why do you need to see anything? In fact, who needs crew on ACV or SES
    these days?
    A 2000 tonne, crewless, Sea-Train at 75 knots would keep those pesky sail
    types from clogging up ports and harbours.
     
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