what do you think of SeaSteading?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Squidly-Diddly, Feb 20, 2019.

  1. dsigned
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    dsigned O.R.C. Hunter

    Roman concrete is not the current state-of-the-art in concrete mix design. While I've been out of the game long enough that there are probably some advances I'm unaware of, I can give you a run-down of what you could build.

    So-called "Roman" concrete makes use of another reaction that's different from the reaction in Portland cement called a pozzolanic reaction. Details aside, what's important for our purposes is that you can add about 15% pozzolanic material in place of portland cement and get something like the best of both worlds. Also of significance are two other advances directly related to concrete: fiberglass rebar and polyvinyl alcohol fibers. The former more or less eliminates the problems associated with ion infiltration with standard steel rebar: rust. When iron (steel) rusts, the volume expands significantly, which is basically the end of your concrete. So fiberglass ensures that even if your concrete does allow ions to interact with your reinforcement, it's not going to royally mess your concrete up.

    PVA fibers address two of the biggest historical flaws of concrete: brittleness and strength in tension (which are related issues). It works much the same way as other chopped fibers do with one major difference being that it has a really strong chemical bond with concrete, so pull out strength becomes more or less a non-issue. This is something of an oversimplification, but I think for the sake of understanding how it benefits the concrete it's "good enough". One final note about PVA fibers is that they contribute to the ability of the concrete to self-heal by essentially keeping it together, and allowing the concrete to re-bond.

    One final area of interest is lightweight concretes. There are a few different ways to achieve this, including ultra-lightweight aggregates and foaming agents (making aircrete), but the upshot is that you could build in bouyancy chambers that would make the vessel very difficult to sink.
     
  2. JamesG123
    Joined: Mar 2015
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    JamesG123 Senior Member


    I think trying to colonize Antarctica would be more practical. lol

    The extreme costs of such an effort requires extreme motivation/justification. About the only things that would qualify would be some kind of military advantage (Chinese SCS bases) or the extraction of some rare and valuable natural resources (oil, deep sea minerals etc.). Surely not an old folks home.

    This then drives how you actually go about doing so. Floating? Submerged? Steel? Concrete? Its all speculation and a million variables engineering and business-wise that have to be considered.
     
  3. dsigned
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    dsigned O.R.C. Hunter

    You're mistaken about the old folks home:
    Senior Living at Sea | The Cruise Web https://cruiseweb.com/senior-living-at-sea/
     
  4. JamesG123
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    JamesG123 Senior Member

    Thats not an old folks home. That is the cruise lines filling the excess capacity on their ships.
     
  5. Squidly-Diddly
    Joined: Sep 2007
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    Most of SF Bay would be covered in houseboats, floating roads, parking lots and 7/11 stores if not for NIMBY laws.

    And that could include full water/sewer etc hookups and insurance.
     
  6. JamesG123
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    JamesG123 Senior Member

    That is an artifact of the distorted real-estate market and a bunch of marinas in a sheltered bay does not a seastead make IMO.
     
  7. midlifecrisis
    Joined: Feb 2019
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    midlifecrisis New Member

    Thank you very much,
    So this information was only lost if you were a geologist or archaeologist, but working civil engineer in marine environments have been familiar with much of this stuff for years.

    However I was in Seattle when the Lake Washington Bridge sunk, so I know that the amount of stupidity needed to cause something to sink is in great supply.
     
  8. Squidly-Diddly
    Joined: Sep 2007
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    I'm thinking if allowed to "run wild" (with only sewer/garbage being required) the developments would organically start edging into deeper and rougher waters (cheaper but more problematic "real estate") and The Market (including Underwriters) would figure out how to solve problems.

    Although going from sheltered swallow flats of SF Bay to just outside the Golden Gate a pretty huge leap. But I could see anchoring old cruise ships about a 1/4 mile out and running ferry service to SF.
     
  9. dsigned
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    dsigned O.R.C. Hunter

    Setting aside the fact that there is at least one cruise ship I found in about five minutes of googling that does indeed cater exclusively to people looking to retire abord full time, you're also neglecting the fact that you're simply wrong. Condos are for sale on cruise ships and are being actively marketed at people as an alternative to a traditional retirement community. I don't know if you've priced those kinds of places lately, but suffice to say a lot of people are paying for resorts anyway, and a cruise ship is able to be competitive with all inclusive resorts (which is what a lot of old folks home are, in effect).
     

  10. JamesG123
    Joined: Mar 2015
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    JamesG123 Senior Member

    I'm not exactly in the market. I guess it never occurred to you that since '08 the cruise lines have had entire ships worth of excess capacity. Marketeers baiting Boomers into pissing away their children's inheritance or what could be better used for charity on living in "luxury", at least until the money runs out, then they will wind up in real old folks homes where their social security only gets them a shared room and lukewarm food.
     
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