What chemical removes cured 3M-5200

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by ecflyer, Jan 5, 2011.

  1. ecflyer
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    ecflyer Junior Member

    Does anyone have experience removing 3M-5200 sealant that is fully cured. I need to remove it off my tempered glass and will try a razor blade on the face side; however, I need a chemical to clean the uneven edges of the glass. I cannot use any type mechanical devices as they will damage the tempered glass.

    Have a Spiffy G'Day
    Earl
     
  2. keysdisease
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    keysdisease Senior Member

  3. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    From my experience: dynamite, C-4 or any other explosive.

    Rubber/latex gloves also work well.

    -Tom
     
  4. KnottyBuoyz
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    KnottyBuoyz Provocateur & Raconteur

    Heat up the blade of a scraper and give that a try.
     
  5. marshmat
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    marshmat Senior Member

    3M's advice about removing the stuff (see the MSDS for details) is:
    It looks like this only works while it's still uncured. Once it's set, a sharp knife is the best bet. If you can find a solvent that attacks urethane polymers but not glass, that might work.
    Without knowing who makes "Anti-Bond" or what chemistry it's based on, I can't offer much other than to say you may as well try it.
     
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  6. mark775

    mark775 Guest

    Heat kills 5200 but I don't know about heating that glass. The advice 3M gave about removing uncured works not as well as denatured alcohol -5200 cleans up like school glue with alcohol before it is cured. The anti-bond has to get under the 5200.
     
  7. kaamaman
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    kaamaman Junior Member

  8. ecflyer
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    ecflyer Junior Member

    Thanks for all the advice

    Submarine Tom, I just don't know what we would all do w/o your words of wisdom. You might be a bull in a china shop, but you definitely know how to "Git-R-Done".
     
  9. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    Sorry ecflyer, I didn't read your post very well.

    A razor scraper should do it.

    -Tom
     
  10. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I've removed it hundreds of times and it has to be abated. A belt sander is quite effective with 24 grit. Chemicals just soften it up, a knife leaves a film. The only real way to insure it's not there is to grind it off.
     
  11. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    CDK retired engineer

    I concur with PAR.
    Remove as much as possible mechanically, then apply a strong alkaline solution like paint stripper or sink cleaner to soften up the residual film and remove that with a Brillo pad.
    Wear gloves!
     
  12. Typhoon
    Joined: Mar 2009
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    Typhoon Senior Member

    I used one of those nylon abrasive wheels to remove some Sikaflex once, it was quite effective. You know the wheels, look like sort of a hard sea sponge. It tended to rip small chunks off the Sika without heating it and making that horrible, acrid blue smoke. And all you had to clean up was a black dust.
     
  13. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    CDK retired engineer

    I think you mean 3M Schotch-brite . Is that correct?
     
  14. indianbayjoe
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    indianbayjoe Senior Member

    Don't use any of the chemical ideas if you still want the area to continue to be sealed which was what it was probably put there for. They will seep into areas you don't want them. Mechanical means are the best and you won't scratch the tempered glass with a razor and those rubber wheels made to remove decals might work too. I think there called an astro wheel
     

  15. Typhoon
    Joined: Mar 2009
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    Location: Australia

    Typhoon Senior Member

    Hey, you're right! I didn't pay attention to the manufacturer's name when I bought them. However, knowing me, I bought some cheap, generic version of these wheels:
     

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