Welsford idea, Micro 8 ,convert plywood in to cut + wet GRP panel made on flat ground

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by mtumut, Oct 26, 2016.

  1. mtumut
    Joined: Mar 2005
    Posts: 73
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 7
    Location: ISTANBUL

    mtumut Junior Member

    I bought micro 8 plans from selway 2 years ago. It is impossible to make it with plywood sold in Istanbul which is more expensive than best but worse than worse plywood sold in Europe and US.

    Istanbul is huge city , 20 000 000 population and between plywood seller and me , there is 150 kilometers. Good epoxy is very expensive etc etc.

    I had been learned a trick from John Welsford which he said to me that I could lay cut rowing glass fiber on to flat ground , wet with polyester and use the final panel for stitching.

    Micro 8 uses two layers of 9mm plywood. Do I need to produce 2 fiberglass panel and epoxy together to compensate 18mm plywood or can I make one thick one ? How much polyester glass rowing fiberglass equal to 18mm marine plywood ? What books told ?

    What maximum thickness of fiberglass panel could be bent like plywood ?

    Please give me the answer to above questions and tell me how much glass rowing and polyester resin makes that thickness ?

    Thank you very much,

    Mustafa Umut Sarac
    Istanbul
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. Tungsten
    Joined: Nov 2011
    Posts: 468
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    Location: Canada

    Tungsten Senior Member

    Im guessing even cheap plywood like OSB Oriented strand board is expensive?Used to sheet walls in wood frame houses.
    You could make a male mold with this then cover in plastic with spray glue then cover with glass and poly resin.
    goggle "how thick is fiberglass" and you'll get an idea of how much glass youll need.

    This would be much easier then making flat panels to stitch together.
     
  3. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    The problem with solid fiberglass, is that it will make panels hugely heavier than plywood for the same stiffness.
     
  4. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Location: Back full time in the UK

    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    Building flat panels in grp on a table mould is a very common, widely used method. But I agree with gonzo, boat hulls are always strong enough, getting enough stiffness is always the problem.

    I did build a 30ft catamaran using solid glass and foam stringers on a flat table. So it certainly does work on catamarans that would otherwise use 6-9mm ply. For what you want you will probably need to use foam sandwich, but I would guess getting pvc foam will be difficult. Maybe you will need to go to SW Turkey for supplies? Lots of wood boats built there

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com
     

  5. Steve W
    Joined: Jul 2004
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    Location: Duluth, Minnesota

    Steve W Senior Member

    18mm seems very thick for a little boat to me.
     
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