Welding a steel hull

Discussion in 'Metal Boat Building' started by Wynand N, Jun 23, 2008.

  1. lumpy bumpy
    Joined: May 2009
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    lumpy bumpy Junior Member

    Ive had a great laugh reading all this , are any of you guys actually time served coded welders or a bunch of chancers who wave a rod about and hope for the best.
     
  2. shugabear
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    shugabear jr member

    geting around bowing and rework


    Im new here so please exuse my ignorence on some of your topics. Yet i have over six years experience with the common 7018, 6010, 6011, and flux core and while i work in a ship repair yard now i was also a boiler maker appr. To get to my point i resently helped replace a 85 ft stretch of bottom hull on the roll of a 735 ft lime stone ocean goer in the process it is easy enough to take out yet when installing new roll plate to old hull you find yourself with alot of strong backs and and dogs what you said about the 6010 and 6011 is true it also is the best thing when you are joining old and new steel yet even with its simplicity they have a tendency to rust unless you only use it to root pass finishing with it may cause repairs earlier than you would like
     
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  3. tazmann
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    tazmann Senior Member

    Rust

    Ya lost me there, The 6010/6011 rust faster or more than what?
    When finished, sandblasted and painted does one hold up better than the other?
     
  4. lumpy bumpy
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    lumpy bumpy Junior Member

    A wouldnt worry about ya work , the rest of the ship will fall to bits first .
     
  5. tazmann
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    tazmann Senior Member

    I wasnt to worried, been welding a lot of years, never noticed one rusting faster than the other when left unpainted!
     
  6. lumpy bumpy
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    lumpy bumpy Junior Member

    What a mean taz is that in shiprepair the ships are usually falling to bits anyway , so whatever you weld its still gonna outlast the rest of the shell. Many a floating coffin bobbing about .
     
  7. shugabear
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    shugabear jr member

    well tazmann from my experience 6011/6010 is a dirty weld mainly because it is easier to use on a already rusted surface unlike 7018 and flux they do not like dirty metal. also the 60s have a tendency to make pin wholes faster due to the jerking of weld motion now for they are ok for original root pass but i would suggest caping with somthing different they due tend to rust faster because they weld to rust
     
  8. shugabear
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    shugabear jr member

    thats some what rude wouldnt you agree most of the people are boat owners they know what they are talking about perhaps you should read more threads:confused:
     
  9. shugabear
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    shugabear jr member

    im with you on that in the ship yard i work at my line of work puts me in direct contact wit ABS QA and the USCG and i have yet have an inspection fail because of arc marks. the only thing that i have been told and know is that if the ark marks show signs of weld metal then they have to be corrected other wise cleaning is all that needed.
     
  10. lumpy bumpy
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    lumpy bumpy Junior Member

    Some of the answers given on welding related topics shows most peoples lack of knowledge which can only be acheived after many years of welding in many various industrys . No insult was intended .
     
  11. lumpy bumpy
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    lumpy bumpy Junior Member

    However you would have thought at least one boat builder would know the location of the spur latch.
     
  12. Guest62110524

    Guest62110524 Previous Member

    as always you are very sensible, how are you? I,ve given up trying find 115 feeders for my hobarts and millers, I,m looking at the miller 350 p with the aluma gun, pm me, Hello Tazz
    Stu
     
  13. shugabear
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    shugabear jr member


    right on tazmann:D
     
  14. Brent Swain
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    Brent Swain Member

    Great post Tom. Right on. Dont take him too seriously. People who met him here in the Comox Valley said he didn't seem to be playing with a full deck.
    Brent
     

  15. lumpy bumpy
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    lumpy bumpy Junior Member

    Brent ya miles of the mark mate. A proven time served welder does not get a "sticky" rod .
    This is how you avoid arc strikes , say for example your welding an overhead butt which may or may not be subject to 100% ut . When you strike an arc you do so approx 1 inch in front of your intended start , immeadiatly move to your start then continue welding thus covering your initial arc strike and also burning out any porosity and slag from your original arc . simple eh
     
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