Weekender/Picnic Vessel, Power and/or Sailing Catamaran

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by brian eiland, Jul 16, 2010.

  1. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    I didn't check the price, but I'm sure it was (is) not cheap. All outboards these days are expensive !!

    oops I did not notice your previous posting where you mention the price,...excuse me Fallguy
     
  2. brian eiland
    Joined: Jun 2002
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    Location: St Augustine Fl, Thailand

    brian eiland Senior Member

    Why 2 of them (engines)?

    Why would someone need 2 of them on a 'sailing boat'? I would be interested in a single engine installation in the center of the vessel, but with connectable steering capabilities that would allow it act in unison with the rudders when docking. I did this on the FP Louisane 37 cat and a early 9.9 Yamaha diesel outboard.
    Weekender/Picnic Vessel, Power and/or Sailing Catamaran https://www.boatdesign.net/threads/weekender-picnic-vessel-power-and-or-sailing-catamaran.33751/page-4#post-873086

    With proper prop selection one could likely get great speed with this diesel.

    And being a common rail fuel injection engine one would have no problem with the engine being stored total flat up in its topsides storage box...no carbs to leak gas.

    No need to search out methods to utilize the other (Austrian/German) diesel engine adaptation,...the Steyr engine I mentioned back on posting #50
     
  3. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    I am building a powercat. I also had reservations about dual crankshaft and ultra new design. If the warranty matched the hype; perhaps I could see it. I could have gotten a 6 year warranty on my engines. Opted for 3 and money off.

    But if you wanted a 70hp engine on the sailboat that weighs 350 pounds; I suppose..
     
  4. brian eiland
    Joined: Jun 2002
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    Location: St Augustine Fl, Thailand

    brian eiland Senior Member

    That might explain it....ha...ha :rolleyes:
     
  5. brian eiland
    Joined: Jun 2002
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    Location: St Augustine Fl, Thailand

    brian eiland Senior Member

    Potential Rigs for this vessel

    I've been reading a fair amount about these biplane (twin masted) vessels recently. It certainly looks like they might make good candidates for this weekender cat idea.

    There are both free-standing versions and stayed versions. the free standing ones naturally are likel a bit more expensive and challenging to build. So serious considerations should be given to the more 'conventional' stayed versions. This one aboard Cactus Island likely deserves study.
    [​IMG]

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    for simplicity the jibs might be left off.

     
  6. Pericles
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    Pericles Senior Member

    P D F. Pretty damn fine. "Her Achilles heel is when the breeze is on the beam". Would that be because the windward rig wind shadows the leeward rig? Just a thought for any future catamarans. Install masts on the hulls with sliding mast feet &/or UJs, to cant windward rig towards bow to bear away & leeward rig astern to point upwind. Almost selfsteering.
    Sorry, but too much experience with the "perpetual luffer to windward" original "Windsurfer" with teak wishbone boom & baggy sail. It colours a chap's thinking, perpetually!!! :oops::(:eek: The boom had to be almost vertical to bear away. :mad:

    Drop both windward sails & pole out the windward with a spinnaker or suitably cut Genoa from windward masthead, to fly ahead of lee rig. T'would make life interesting.
     
  7. brian eiland
    Joined: Jun 2002
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    Location: St Augustine Fl, Thailand

    brian eiland Senior Member

    Perhaps those results are a result of the use of round tube mast.

    From my number of readings yesterday. it appears as though the vessels making use of airfoil shaped, rotating biplane mast are fairly much better in that respect of beam reaching. Of course these rigs are quite a bit more expensive.
     

  8. brian eiland
    Joined: Jun 2002
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    Location: St Augustine Fl, Thailand

    brian eiland Senior Member

    Yesterday I spent a good bit of time looking at this duel mast, biplane rig technology that has been developing up till this latest Chris White vessel 'Saphira', and that 'Ozone' vessel. Sure seems to have a LOT of possibilities to simplify things. In fact I think it might make a very good rig for my 'gamefishing under sail' vessel.




    Multihull Structure Thoughts https://www.boatdesign.net/threads/multihull-structure-thoughts.62361/page-77#post-880303
    Multihull Structure Thoughts https://www.boatdesign.net/threads/multihull-structure-thoughts.62361/page-77#post-880519
     
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