Wecboat : Wave Energy Converter Boat

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by WecBoat, Jul 4, 2014.

  1. WecBoat
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    WecBoat Navy Blue

    35 years after my first boat design, I am now playing with completely new concepts. One of them is a Wave Energy Converter Boat or let's name it a wecboat.

    A wecboat, a boat able to harness the power of the wave and convert it into electricity or others forms to be use for its own propulsion. If we want this ability, the purpose of the hull will change and the design too.

    In a near future, the boats could look very different from what we use to see. The boat himself could be the generator. In some of them, the hull will serve as a stator. We will see boats with longs arms, like spiders, able to convert the wave energy into electricity.

    Yes, lots of them will fail to pass the shakedown test, but others will cross oceans.

    Have you think about it ? I will like to hear from you.

    André
     
  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The main problem with a setup like that, is that the drag generated is usually more than the available energy. Stationary setups can use wave energy.
     
  3. kerosene
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    kerosene Senior Member

    I call bs.
     
  4. WecBoat
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    Drag

    Thanks for your answer. Yes, that is one of the challenge. Drag. To minimize it, lets say that a wecboat will not go faster then is hull speed. We can imagine a wecboat that will not have more drag than a sailboat.

    For an example, the system, lets call it the « wave harness », could be install inside the boat.
     
  5. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    This may be of interest to you - found it by accident

    http://www.bluebird-electric.net/wave_powered_ships_marine_renewable_energy_research.htm



    edit:
    " WHALE OF A TAIL

    Reasearch by N. Bose and J. Lien at the Memorial University of Newfoundland in 1989, found that the flukes of cetaceans are capable of absorbing energy from ocean waves for propulsion. The extent of this energy absorption is demonstrated by considering the flukes of an immature fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus). In a fully developed seaway corresponding to a wind speed of 20 knots (around Beaufort force 5) and at a low swimming speed, of 2.5 m s-1, this whale was able to absorb up to 25% of its required propulsive power in head seas and 33% of propulsive power in following seas. See O-Foil below."
     

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    Last edited: Jul 5, 2014
  6. WecBoat
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    Thanks Mr. Watson for this link to a brief wave power history. It is a good start for somebody how want to know what was done before on the subject.

    The Suntory Mermaid II with Kenichi Horie is one of my favorite.

    But when I go at one to two knots, I am not very happy and against any wind or current it could be dangerous. I think that a successful wecboat should be able to go at his hull speed.
     
  7. WecBoat
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    WecBoat Navy Blue

    If we take a look at the history of wave power, we can see that they all look in the same direction : foils and fins.

    I think it will be better to convert the wave power in electricity before using it. There is lost of energy to convert it, but, if we start with more power we will end with more power.

    Fins and foils have a limited power. I have chose to work with gravity instead. The power is directly proportional to the weight of the boat.
     
  8. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    It is very likely that I'm interpreting incorrectly what you say because I think if we talk about energy generated by waves, power is not "directly proportional to the weight of the boat." It has nothing to do with the weight of the boat but with the energy that has the wave itself.
     
  9. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    It would actually be inversely proportional. A very light vessel with a large reserve floatation and a large submerged plate will produce the most energy. That is the goal on bouys that harness wave energy. Inertia makes the vessel move up and down less, which produces less energy.
     
  10. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Yes, exactly. Its the total displacement that counts. The differential between the movement of the wave and the force generated as a result.

    A submerged submarine has the heaviest boat to water ratio, and it would be hardly affected by the waves relative to it.

    Here is one already in production that generates electricity

     
  11. WecBoat
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    WecBoat Navy Blue

    Dear Tansl, I am interested in the energy of the boat himself. After the wave had transfer its own energy to the boat. The rolling motion, for example.
     
  12. WecBoat
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    WecBoat Navy Blue

    Yes, exactly. A large TOTAL displacement.
     
  13. WecBoat
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    WecBoat Navy Blue

    The bigger is the buoys, the bigger is the power. It is exactly what I mean. The bigger is the wecboat, the bigger is the power.
     
  14. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Okay, you want to use the energy the wave has transmitted to the hull, but bear in mind that, in the transfer of wave / hull energy, some losses occur, so that the system, perhaps, is less effective than another system which directly uses the energy of the wave.
    This is clear, need not be demostrate. So I think it's probably that I'm not understanding how your system Works.
     

  15. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    So what exactly is your idea?
    Can we see a sketch?
    Or a formula relating motion to energy?

    The reason engineering/ physics ideas are not defined in words is that they are so imprecise. It is difficult enough with formulas with extensive assumptions defined.

    You have nothing.
    You don't even have a word description of the mechanism you want to make.
     
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