Wave height for ~550' between crests?

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by bntii, Aug 15, 2011.

  1. bntii
    Joined: Jun 2006
    Posts: 731
    Likes: 97, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 1324
    Location: MD

    bntii Senior Member

    Can the wave height be guessed at for a length of ~550' between crests


    Thanks
     
  2. Ad Hoc
    Joined: Oct 2008
    Posts: 6,973
    Likes: 917, Points: 113, Legacy Rep: 2488
    Location: Japan

    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Yes you can. BUT, there are many variables that need to be consdierd before provding a "guess".

    Such as wind driven, fetch, depth of water, steepness of profile and period. Without knowing these, the wave length of a deep ocean wave and its height would be very different from a wave of same length in shore in limited depth, as an example.
     
  3. bntii
    Joined: Jun 2006
    Posts: 731
    Likes: 97, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 1324
    Location: MD

    bntii Senior Member

    Thanks much for that.
    I was looking through some old satellite photos & took note of a few containing these wave trains striking a coast.
    Not much info could be had other than depth for this shore line.
     
  4. Ad Hoc
    Joined: Oct 2008
    Posts: 6,973
    Likes: 917, Points: 113, Legacy Rep: 2488
    Location: Japan

    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Here is just two of many "typical" guessing guides you may come across:

    Y-stab-4.jpg wave heights.jpg
     
  5. daiquiri
    Joined: May 2004
    Posts: 5,373
    Likes: 252, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3380
    Location: Italy (Garda Lake) and Croatia (Istria)

    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    1 person likes this.
  6. bntii
    Joined: Jun 2006
    Posts: 731
    Likes: 97, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 1324
    Location: MD

    bntii Senior Member

    Thanks both- the photo just caught my eye as perhaps a chance image of some storm surge coming ashore.
    The photo is of Cape Hatteras on 2/28/1993 (google earth).
     
  7. SheetWise
    Joined: Jul 2004
    Posts: 279
    Likes: 54, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 658
    Location: Phoenix

    SheetWise All Beach -- No Water.

    I'm also interested in any input here. Swells, waves, and seas -- I'm sometimes confused by this -- they're the same, but different. I've read about ratios that limit development, but those limits -- as seen on shore -- would be unnavigable at sea. What "rule of thumb" or heuristic do you use to determine wavelength to height?
     
  8. philSweet
    Joined: May 2008
    Posts: 2,434
    Likes: 252, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1082
    Location: Beaufort, SC and H'ville, NC

    philSweet Senior Member

    Wavelength and height are nearly independent in ocean waves. Wavelength and velocity are closely related. There are different models for sea waves that produce differing predictions for orbital motion of the surface and therefore different decay and interference phenomena.


    The Wiki entry for cnoidal waves seems to be the best cross-linked article. You can get pretty much anywhere from there.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cnoidal_wave
     
    1 person likes this.

  9. SheetWise
    Joined: Jul 2004
    Posts: 279
    Likes: 54, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 658
    Location: Phoenix

    SheetWise All Beach -- No Water.

    Thanks philSweet --

    I'll follow it further as I have time. One thing that I've noticed over the years about wikipedia is that when they comment on a field I master -- they're abysmally wrong, and don't always accept corrections and advice very well. It makes me distrust the site on subjects I want to learn. Always good to get a thumbs up on wikipedia from someone who know the topic. Thanks again.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.