Water in oil in 1970 Volvo Penta AQ170 Petrol inboard

Discussion in 'Gas Engines' started by Les Hartley, Jul 21, 2012.

  1. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I usually add about 1qt of diesel fuel or paint thinner to the oil and run it at idle for 10-15 minutes after it warms up. It helps take the sludge off. Don't run it at high RPMs though.
     
  2. powerabout
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    powerabout Senior Member

    good idea
     
  3. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    Geeeezus---thats just thin oil --try ATF high detergent 51W auto transmission fluid.

    But I would not on my engines.
     
  4. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Diesel fuel or paint thinner for thinning oil in cold weather has been used for decades. With multigrade oil is not necessary any more though.
     
  5. Les Hartley
    Joined: Jul 2012
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    Les Hartley Junior Member

    Thanks all you fellas. I think I might go with adding the diesel fuel into the engine oil and keep changing the oil and filter and see how that goes. You've all been a great help with my problem. What a great group to be associated with!!! I live adjacent to the Murray River which is the State Border between New South Wales and Victoria near Wentworth. If any of you are ever over this way give me a yell. You will be made most welcome. Again, thanks very very much mates. Best Regards Les
     
  6. Les Hartley
    Joined: Jul 2012
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    Les Hartley Junior Member

    G'day all, I'm back with the continuing thread about my Volvo Penta. On your advic I changed the oil/water and oil filter and with a new filter fitted, refilled the engine with 1.5 litre if diesel fuel and 2.0 litres of multigrade oil, ran the engine up to operating temperature, then let the motor run for about 10 minutes. Drained the sump, replaced the oil filter and repeated the mixture twice more, with the oil clearing a bit more each time. Finally today ran the engine with 3.75 litres of diesel only for a final rinse, drained the sump and changed the oil filter, then refilled with engine oil, and you guessed it, NO WATER IN THE OIL.!!! You bloody beauty. Once again, thanks to all concerned. Best Regards Les.
     
  7. fixes
    Joined: Dec 2012
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    Location: sydney australia

    fixes New Member

    The small hexagonal bronze pump sucks water into the boat; it is the SEAWATER PUMP. Behind the rubber impeller there is a pair of standard flared seals(w. Stainless springs!) face to face, which harden, and when disturbed e.g. removing the pump to fit a new alternator belt ( bitter experience) allow salt water to rapidly pump into the sump past the camshaft end. Take the hoses off the pump instead. This is the first place to check; change them anyway, you have to dig them out to check them. Bearing outlets have them. There is NO weep hole. The large iron pump, driven by the pulley belt, is the CIRCULATING PUMP; it draws hot water out of the block and into the exhaust gas stream. It has a weep hole,but this is only a tell-tale for seal failure.Blockage won't pressurise the pump, which is not connected to the oil system, but does push salt water into the shaft bearings, which aren't stainless. Both pumps handle the same water so it is not helpful to refer to 'raw water', a term which applies to a different cooling system. SPARES. Both pumps are cheaply repairable. The only volvo part needed is the lock wire for the circulating pump housing. The integral-bearing shaft and ceramic hydraulic seal are standard swimming pool pump parts from bearing suppliers......just cut the shaft ends down to suit with a grinder (don't let too much heat travel down the shaft...the ball races are nylon). The seal must have a stainless seat cup. Bed the seal in neutral silicon. Press the bronze impeller just below (15thou) the pump face). A sparkplug socket is the right sized drift. Take your pressed-out parts with you when shopping. Don't press the pulley flange on back-to-front....Dohhhh! Check your oil AFTER warmup every time you go out- water lies below cold oil Cheers, fellow spirits. Neil
     
  8. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    I hate these kind of pumps. If I had a spare belt slot I might consider converting to a self contained type.

    If your site is underwater then a centrifugal pump can be used.
     
  9. TrueBlue Aussie
    Joined: May 2013
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    Location: Victor Harbor South Australia

    TrueBlue Aussie New Member

    Aq170 B30

    G'day Les,

    Congratulations, you are lucky! I have a Savage Bluefin approx 23ft, fitted with a AQ170 B30. Guess what, Water in oil.
    I have replaced oil cooler, sea pump, (with impeller and shaft) and a few other bits. She still gets water in sump. The motor runs like clockwork but obviously I cannot use it, water in oil is NOT good for the motor!!
    I have spoken to many backyard "experts" and quite a few marine mechanical "experts" but the 'old Girl is still in the driveway on her trailer.
    I read all of the info on this site in relation to your problem and was quite impressed with the unsolicited advice given to you. I am now wondering if all my trouble stems from the seals in the sea pump.
    If you can, please advise re your experience.
    Regards;
    Dennis (True Blue)
     
  10. fixes
    Joined: Dec 2012
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    Location: sydney australia

    fixes New Member

    aq170 Water Intake Pumps...water in the oil

    g'day, ......a bit late, but...sorry Dennis, that I didn't relate the rest of my sad story about the AQ170 water intake pump seals; If they're not recently new, and you've disturbed the shaft (pump off, new impeller, new belt), put new seals in. They harden and will pump water into the sump.You will have to dig them out. Take them and the pump to a bearing supplies shop and get stainless- backed replacements, about $15 each. Mount them back-to-back, one flare to the water, the other to the oil, in a smear of neutral silicon and pack the flares with grease. N.B!! When changing a pulley belt, take the water hoses off to pass it thru, NOT the pump body.......go on, ask me how I know about this job, and on twin engines, 30 litres of oil change and 2 pairs of filters! NEIL
     
  11. powerabout
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    powerabout Senior Member

    run the engine with the seawater pump and oil cooler bypassed and use the hose to cool it
    slow the flow and let the engine heat up to boil the moisture out of the oil and if you still get water in the oil its not from the seawater pump or cooler then.

    PS in my apprenticeship I installed a few of those new into Bluefins
     

  12. Joris
    Joined: Mar 2013
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    Location: belgium

    Joris Junior Member

    I know it is common to try to boil out water by running an engine or adding something like thinner or diesel to engine oil but dont underestimated the negative effects on the lubrication/engine protection that engine oil should provide. Almost every engine will suffer damage and engine life will be reduced significantly. Water, diesel, thinner will basically ruin your oil/engine.
     
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