Wanting to build a stitch and glue gheenoe-like craft

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by DentonDon, Aug 26, 2013.

  1. ancient kayaker
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    "Estimated materials cost to build the DK Touring Canoe (not including plywood): ~$220"

    However that is not really relevant as your not using the same materials. Looks like a nice 5-plank design; I see no reason why you can't use the same construction method as I did, with chine logs glued to the ply sheer and bottom planks while flat. The corners of the molds and frame will need to be notched for the logs of course.
     
  2. DentonDon
    Joined: Aug 2013
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    DentonDon Junior Member

    Fair enough. I've still done enough pricing and planning to know how to keep in <$100.
    4 Sheets Lauan
    Free Scrap wood
    1 Gallon Titebond III
    1 roll of Fibatape
    1 Quart of Paint
    roughly adds up to $75 depending on what you get and where you get it
     
  3. Skyak
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    Skyak Senior Member

    The two chine JEM is a major improvement to the flat bottom you planned as far as efficiency goes. Nice material utilization too. The only thing you lose is massive load capacity but I don't think the overloaded flat bottom was realistic anyway because it would be so hard to push with the transom well below the surface. Speaking of which, the JEM canoe is not simple to just cut off. You need to sweep the floor up to get the transom out of the water which will require some development. The nice thing about double enders is that they stay efficient even when you load them down. Ancientkayaker has done some fine work on similar designs. Maybe he can help you with the development. Another possibility is to make a triangular transom -wide on top to mount the motor, but a point on the bottom so it won't drag much area below the surface.

    Also, about the glue plan, check out http://www.boatdesign.net/wiki/Mate...netrating.22_Epoxies_vs_standard_Epoxy_Resins

    specifically what they say about PL premium construction adhesive -It sounds like the low budget winner.
     
  4. ancient kayaker
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: Alliston, Ontario, Canada

    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    Thanks for the compliments, El Guero and Skyak! For a design intended primarily to be easy to build, it certainly came out easy on the eye, and a good performer too.

    Dan, the DK Touring Canoe plans likely gave you the plank shapes or "developments", as is usual for a boat intended for a stitch and glue build. The DK Touring Canoe is 18' long, and you want a 13 - 14' boat with a transom. Warning: you can't just shorten the planks, the effect on the hull shape will probably be weird and the planks may not even go together. When a hull design is changed in just one dimension such as length, it changes every dimension of the plank developments . . . and I haven't even got to the changes needed to created a transom . . .

    Whatever changes to an existing design you plan to try, check it out with a reasonably accurate model, no smaller than 1:6.
     
  5. DentonDon
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    DentonDon Junior Member

    Well to tell you the truth, I found the DK as I was looking for plans to something that would best match your design.
    Also, I wasn't really planning on using molds which I know makes it harder, but its just another thing to build and spend money on. :/

    And I didn't plan on using the dimensions of the DK, but rather use the plans as a framework for my plan if that makes sense.

    You don't have your Dora plans available to interested parties do you? :)


    What I'd really like to do is build the Storer 12'6" OB now that I'm on the planked hull track. Just can't spend 50 bones on the plans.
    Sorry if I seem uber cheap :(
     
  6. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    OK, you are uber cheap.

    :)

    Why don't you go skin on frame? It is cheaper, and lighter, and just as strong.
     
  7. DentonDon
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    DentonDon Junior Member

    haha Just because I want to work with wood...
    I do intend to use quality materials on a future build so this is my baby step in that direction. :)
     
  8. ancient kayaker
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    Dora never got developed as far as a formal set of plans, there's a FreeShip file and a sketch of the ply sheet cutting plan in my blog, which isn't dimensioned, and that was all I used. I guess the dimensions were in my head but not any more.

    It was only intended as a transitional design, part of my self-instruction course on boat designing and building. I could pull the dimensions off the hull, but it's not really what you want, is it?
     

  9. DentonDon
    Joined: Aug 2013
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    DentonDon Junior Member

    nah. I'm just going to try to duplicate the the fisher 12'6" OB the best I can and possible use your chines for strength.
    Thanks
     
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