Visually pleasing profile

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Nojjan, Jul 31, 2007.

?

Which do you like best?

Poll closed Aug 30, 2007.
  1. Profile 1

    18 vote(s)
    45.0%
  2. Profile 2

    5 vote(s)
    12.5%
  3. Profile 3

    17 vote(s)
    42.5%
  1. Nojjan
    Joined: Sep 2006
    Posts: 111
    Likes: 4, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 30
    Location: North Europe

    Nojjan All thumbs...

    Which do you like best?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. kapnD
    Joined: Jan 2003
    Posts: 1,028
    Likes: 234, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 40
    Location: hawaii, usa

    kapnD Senior Member

    They all look the same to me, except for the shearline. I like #1, as I favor lobsterboat types, and can envision that one as a sleek, fast "picnic boat" style. Are the transoms intended to look round? Don
     
  3. Nojjan
    Joined: Sep 2006
    Posts: 111
    Likes: 4, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 30
    Location: North Europe

    Nojjan All thumbs...

    Yes, the transom is round intentionally. I am not sure what kind of running effects that would produce but I find it pleasing to the eye !! ;-)
     
  4. PI Design
    Joined: Oct 2006
    Posts: 673
    Likes: 21, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 328
    Location: England

    PI Design Senior Member

    I voted for #2.
     
  5. water addict
    Joined: Jun 2004
    Posts: 317
    Likes: 6, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 73
    Location: maryland

    water addict Naval Architect

    depends on the overall style of the boat, what type of superstructure you want. If you are looking for the sportfisher type, I'd go with 2 or 3. If you want a picnic boat, lobster boat look, I'd vote 1
     
  6. charmc
    Joined: Jan 2007
    Posts: 2,391
    Likes: 78, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 840
    Location: FL, USA

    charmc Senior Member

    Water addict said it well.
     
  7. PsiPhi
    Joined: May 2007
    Posts: 181
    Likes: 6, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 44
    Location: Queensland

    PsiPhi Newbie

    No. 1 looks like a sail/row boat
    No. 2 looks like a power boat
    No. 3 looks like an aubergine
     
  8. Willallison
    Joined: Oct 2001
    Posts: 3,590
    Likes: 130, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 2369
    Location: Australia

    Willallison Senior Member

    Bollocks! It's obvious that #2 looks like an aubergine!

    I'm with the others - it really depends what the rest of the boat looks like. Though I do think that aesthetically, there's a hint too much reverse sheer in #3

    The rounded transom will have a marginal effect on the amount of lift generated by the aft sections of the boat, but since the bulk of the lift is generated much further fwd, it will be of little consequence. There are plenty of succesful planing hulls about that don't have blunt butts..
     
  9. Nojjan
    Joined: Sep 2006
    Posts: 111
    Likes: 4, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 30
    Location: North Europe

    Nojjan All thumbs...

    To give a better perspective see attached (version #2 shown, not that it can be seen). It is intended as a transport/fishing/island-hopping boat, i.e. versitile. It is still missing a center console.

    BR / Jon
     

    Attached Files:

  10. Raggi_Thor
    Joined: Jan 2004
    Posts: 2,457
    Likes: 64, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 711
    Location: Trondheim, NORWAY

    Raggi_Thor Nav.arch/Designer/Builder

    I voted for #1, but with this perspective I think I'd go for #2.
     
  11. USCGRET/E8
    Joined: Jul 2007
    Posts: 164
    Likes: 4, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 41
    Location: Nowhere

    USCGRET/E8 Senior Chief

    Many of the Chesapeake Bay deadrise boats had round sterns as did the Bartenders. For better planning, they had large one piece trim tabs.
     
  12. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
    Posts: 3,731
    Likes: 122, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1404
    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    I chose #1. I admit to a prejudice against reverse sheers, especially reVERSING sheers. Style for the sake of style never makes sense to me on a boat any more than it does on a house. This boat is not what I'm talking about----- a hogged bow is useful in limiting spray-in-the-face. I would do the same with flare, Maine lobster boat style, but I appreciate the function and form of a gentle reversing sheer on the right boat.
    #1 is just my own subjective favorite.

    Alan
     
  13. Nojjan
    Joined: Sep 2006
    Posts: 111
    Likes: 4, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 30
    Location: North Europe

    Nojjan All thumbs...

    Style for the sake of style is what sells in many cases today, I see it all the time. However, I am a firm believer in "form-follows-function". The intension with a slightly reversing sheer is to make the fore-deck more comfortable and safe to stand on. Here in northern Europe most small boats are entered over the bow. I will add handrails and non-slip surface but it helps to have a more level surface.
    BR / Jon
     
  14. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
    Posts: 3,731
    Likes: 122, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1404
    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    I never thought of that, Nojjan. You are either east or west coast, guessing Stockholm area. My first wife was Swedish. We lived in Helsingborg and then in Goteborg. I was only there for a few months, so I didn't have the opportunity to see much of the boating culture.
    The bow-on entry seems to indicate a shortage of slip space in your country, and a solution that dispenses with space-eating "finger docks".
    The difference probably lies in the tides. Ours are 11-25 feet.
    I would guess that sailboats are generally entered stern-on?

    Alan
     

  15. Nojjan
    Joined: Sep 2006
    Posts: 111
    Likes: 4, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 30
    Location: North Europe

    Nojjan All thumbs...

    I live in Gothenburg (on what is sometimes referd to as the "front side" or "salty side" of Sweden). Most small to medium size boats here are entered over the bow, sail or power. I am not sure of why but it could have to do with the excessive island day-sailing. People take their boats out for a spin (sail or power) and go out to some island and tie up to the sloping rock-face and the only way to do this is to go bow first. This is also why almost all nordic produced boats (Windy, Targa, Nimbus etc.) have open pulpits.
     

    Attached Files:

Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.