Vinyl?

Discussion in 'Materials' started by Schoonner, Dec 20, 2011.

  1. Schoonner
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Schoonner Senior Member

    How do I find out if Vinly like is used to make house windows will be a good construction material for portholes? One of the demonstrations we used to use was to lay a window down flat on the floor and pretend it was a trampoline. I've never broken a window, and we jumped on them over and over again for quite a while going door to door. (We sold a LOT of windows too.):D
     
  2. Steve W
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    Steve W Senior Member

    Huh, every vinyl window i have ever seen still has glass panes, what type of window are you talking about?
    Steve.
     
  3. Schoonner
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    Schoonner Senior Member

    I was thinking that vinyl, while heavier than aluminum, might be cheaper to manufacture than aluminum. I know they would be easier to make as the frames can be extruded through a form thing and made any shape even round or elliptical just as easily by bending them as they are formed.

    So, inexpensive, any shape imaginable, and easy to manufacture... I just thought maybe it would be a good idea.

    Oh, and they stand up to elements pretty well on houses, but maybe the salt water would destroy them? idk.
     
  4. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    What are you talking about? Working with vinyl, PVC or other plastics in this fashion, requires a considerable investment in equipment, you wouldn't be able to put in your garage, let alone understand. The shade tree builder can do some welding and simple forming, but, much more then softening some in an oven or ultrasonic or heat gun welding, working with these materials is way outside the abilities of a the home builder.
     
  5. Schoonner
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    Schoonner Senior Member

    Oh, I was not thinking about someone trying to do it at home. I would like to build kits like a plastic scale model is made. That way, you purchase a kit, know it is fair, and can just stitch and glue the hull in a week or less.

    Of course I wouldn't be using free online plans, so I can't do that until I get the money to go to westlawn. (I don't think I can get financial aid.)

    EDIT:: It would take all the guess work out of making your own yacht, but the kit would have to be inexpensive. I want to buy one of those poplar tree farms and make my own plywood eventually as well as a factory to produce composite materials so I could keep costs down. Forget all the manpower to build yachts on site, let the buyer build it for himself and just ship completed bulkheads and frames, planks, and everything to the buyer with instruction videos, service manuals yada yada. Maybe even get my own small engine company with small and efficient engines.
     
  6. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

  7. Schoonner
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    Schoonner Senior Member

    Cool! how much does one big enough to live full time on cost?
     
  8. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    They cost more than I was willing to pay! ha ha ha :)

    The Bob Oram designed Duflex boats are a reasonable price, if you live in Australia. The import cost to the USA was way too much for me, compared to just going at it from raw materials.

    I just wanted to point out that there are lots of kit boats on the market already, so you were aware.
     
  9. Schoonner
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    Schoonner Senior Member

    Oh, okay. Thanks. I want to cut costs by manufacturing everything, even the epoxy, in-house. I know it would be a big investment for the machines and I would need skilled people in chemistry, machinery maintenance, and more stuff too. I figure that if I even started my own logistics company Not only could I employ some of my family who are welders, truckers, interior designers, and computer engineers, but I could also cut out middlemen and create jobs. I'd also want to start a wooden boat building school for young people who might not be able to go to school otherwise. There are many aspects of building yachts, and many trades could be taught on the job alongside boat building like design, cabinetry, mechanical technology and repair, robotics, engineering, hydrodynamics, aerodynamics, logistics, chemistry, science, metalurgy, (Spelling?) welding, glass blowing... etc. All kinds of entry level trades could be taught on the job for people with little or no prior work experience.

    Would probably need a billion or two to start though, and I don't even think Uncle Sam has that much to grant anyone anymore.
     
  10. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The first thing you need is to hire a business consultant instead of trying to get free advice on everything. You can get one for maybe $70-100k a year. The rest of the crew and equipment may be just a few million bucks. For someone asking about a free boat because he can't afford a junker, this is a pipe dream.
     
  11. Schoonner
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    Schoonner Senior Member

    Well, if it makes any difference, I am trading my bike for a car, I'm looking for work, and I've been clean for about a month. (Huge improvements) I might even get a Toyota Corolla without too many miles which is even reliable. So much for toys... I am going to be trading lots of things like stereo equipment that I built myself for things like a real washer and dryer so I can have clean clothing every day without having to haul a hand cart full of clothing down the street to the laundromat and spending $50.00 every month. The next step is to get financial aid for schooling. I have ruled out going to westlawn, but I just found out that a mathematician makes at least 90k+ per year, and that can't be that difficult for me to obtain. The last episode of college showed me that I can indeed maintain a 3.7 GPA if all I take is math.
     
  12. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    You may want to wait for whatever chemicals are affecting your brain to leave your body before making those decisions. Mathematicians may make that kind of money after getting tenure at an exclusive university. Most work on other fields. 3.7 GPA will not qualify you for those universities too.
     
  13. Schoonner
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Schoonner Senior Member

    I have weaned myself off antidepressants and all other medications. I did this because I felt like I was always just getting deeper into depression and the only way to come back is to clean myself out from the chemicals. So far, I have a clean house, drive to do something other than stay up all night and draw, as well as a potential girlfriend. On the medication I couldn't function, but the doctors kept telling me that, oh, it will get better just keep taking it. Well, I'm tired of not being able to be a man so I QUIT taking those stupid pills. Things are looking up. I found out that the chemicals never really leave your body, but the excess that causes the physical side effects are gone already. That, and I can do all my dishes before getting overly OCD and trying to polish all my pots and pans in the house to like new perfection.

    EDIT:: I also quit smoking cigarettes.
     
  14. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Hey Schooner. I know someone very well who has OCD and has/had conditions that required medications.

    Often, one medication (or a combination of them) will work badly with an individual, while another medication would work well.

    My friend had OCD and PTSD from childhood trauma. They were first prescribed Celexa for depression. Wrong diagnosis, but were on it for a year. It only worked some, fixing the depression side of things.

    Next, they were diagnosed bipolar (wrong again) and went on some kind of drug I can't remember for that. It didn't work and they had some bad physical side effects.

    Finally, a competent doctor diagnosed them with PTSD and they went on Zoloft. The change was dramatic. It was like she had her real self finally freed from all the overpowering emotions that used to screw everything up in her life. She is now able to work well, handle problems well and has the extra free mental energy (from the PTSD being gone) to fix up her OCD herself. For example, she leaves the house now without checking on all kinds of things first. (Is the stove on? etc...)

    She is a great person, but a lot of people thought she was a jerk or was crazy because the PTSD and OCD held her back. Now that she is free of them, it's like she was born again.

    She is experiencing no side effects from the Zoloft (small dosage - keep dosages at the minimum to avoid side effects) and is now free to concentrate on new things in her life instead of battling the PTSD.

    I say this because I understand your situation. Going completely off, if you are not 100% recovered is not the best route because if you find the right med that will alleviate your anxiety or depression or whatever you might be suffering from, it will free up that mental energy you use to fight it and you will be able to use that energy to achieve other things, or permanently fix something inside.

    Hope you don't take offense. I just have some experience understanding this kind of situation. Good luck!
     
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  15. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I'm surprised you didn't suggest for him to take the epoxy treatment cure ;)
     
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