Vintage low speed diesel for steel St. Pierre Dory

Discussion in 'Diesel Engines' started by skip walker, Dec 24, 2017.

  1. skip walker
    Joined: Dec 2017
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    Location: fort lauderdale

    skip walker Junior Member

    Hi Boaters,
    I am working with a naval architect to design a St Pierre Dory for inland cruising, mostly ICW.
    I have long dreamed of owning something with some style and character like the African Queen with Bogart, the sound of a low speed diesel is soothing like music.
    Could you guys give me some pointers on what engine, where to buy, parts availability, etc...
    Listeroid is too heavy and big, but cool. Lister, gardener, petter, etc, I have money set aside for the build and would like to decide on engine soon to be included in the drawings.
    My focus is not on big horsepower, just gobs of torque.
    Your ideas would be appreciated!
    Merry Christmas!
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Are you looking for a vintage engine?
     
  3. nemier
    Joined: Jan 2004
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    Location: North Vancouver, Canada

    nemier Specialist in long-range Expedition Yachts

    Hi Skip. Merry Christmas!
    What will be the final displacement of your new boat? Then I'll come back to you with a few options.
     
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  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The newer engines will be much lighter and more efficient, if overly complex, compairtivly. Generally, your NA should have a pretty good idea what they think would be a good choice, based on several factors, including your concerns, if voiced.

    As to pricing and availability, well this is subject to wild swings, depending on location and how shrewd a deal maker you might be.
     
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  5. skip walker
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    skip walker Junior Member

    Ideally, yes. Unless there is a 600 rpm engine available in modern production.
     
  6. skip walker
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    skip walker Junior Member

    7500# with full length weighted shoal keel 24' water line
     
  7. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

  8. skip walker
    Joined: Dec 2017
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    skip walker Junior Member

    My NA has recommended a Bedford lifeboat diesel, anyone have any knowledge of these?
     
  9. skip walker
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    skip walker Junior Member

    Look at this beauty,
    SABB
     
  10. makobuilders
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Location: Atlanta, USA

    makobuilders Member

    In India and China they still manufacture these slow industrial small hp engines. Hand started by spinning the heavy flywheel. Run at a couple hundred rpm. If you want to get adventurous then think about those - shop on IndiaMart or Alibaba.
     

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    Last edited: Dec 25, 2017
  11. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Slow turning diesels are heavy and not especially efficient, so if this is what you want, you'll likely need to rebuild some old monolith that has way less power for it's weight than a modern, high turning engine. There are quite s few small air cooled diesels available from most of the common manufactures. These are intended as garden tractor and stationary engine replacements. Kohler, Kawasaki, Hatz, etc. all make them.
     
  12. skip walker
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    skip walker Junior Member

    So do you recommend just sticking with a yanmar ygm10?
     
  13. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Unless the engine is in the open and you want the antique look, there is no good reason to have ancient technology.
     
  14. JosephT
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    JosephT Senior Member

    I sailed in a 26ft sloop with an old 1 cylinder Yanmar diesel about a month ago. We motored up the inlet and that motor was just a clanking away. Unless you've got a reliable list of spare parts lined up you're probably better off looking for a relatively newer engine. Yanmar's smallest marine diesel now is a 2 piston 1GM10 model. It's got a relaxing little thump to it.

     

  15. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    You can use whatever you'd like. My point is service, parts availability, power to weight profiles, etc. all will effect the choice you make. It's nice to think an old Lister will do - no electrical system, hand crank, toss a few compression releases and you're running. Then some very cold winter morning you need to crank her up, but the oil is so thick, you can't hand turn the puppy, now you're stuck. I had this happen once with an old 3 cylinder Lister. Modern engines have a lot going for them, though some of the technology might be above you, it's not hard to learn it. More importantly about modern engines, is you can go anywhere in the world and a mechanic can be found to fix it or parts are available, without scrounging through diesel bone yards, looking for a part. I personally like old, slow turning engines, but I'm also a good mechanic and don't mind pulling pistons out of an old block, so your decision also needs to be based on your comfort levels and skill sets, not mine.

    For example, I have a 1996 Chevy Suburban, bought it new. It has 250,000 miles on it and I know every single part that has been replaced, because I did most of them. I've been looking forward to tearing this engine apart, because it's my first I've owned from birth to rebuild, so I know what to expect. I've built many engines previously, but they usually got sold with something or blew up during it's racing career, etc. I got to yanked this engine recently and torn it down, for the usual machine work. I was very surprised by her condition. The rings where within a couple of thousands of worn out spec, meaning I could have gotten maybe 300 K out of it. Very little sludge, because I was pretty good about keeping her changed and clean. The cam had a flat spot on one lobe (why I decided to tear her down), but other wise worn as normally as you'd think. This is why I was excited about the tear down, I knew what care and service she'd had. If you're this type of person, go find an old Lister (or something) and have fun (in my way of thinking) or you can error on the side of reliability and less greasy hands with a newer, modern engine. There's lots of good choices on both sides of the debate.
     
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