Vintage, lapstrake, clench nailed I-14

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by guam2250, Sep 26, 2016.

  1. guam2250
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    guam2250 Junior Member

    Recently acquired, approximately 1937 I-14, in very good condition. I don't want to change anything and would like to be accurate on replacement of missing items. The false floor is missing. Starting at the second rib from the transom, and continuing forward to the mast step rib, are 3/4" square spots on all of the ribs. They start at the keelson(?) and go up each rib to the vertical supports for the seats. The marks were caused by 3/4" wood, which blocked sunlight fading, and spaced every 2-1/2". In the photo, masking tape squares show the pattern. If the 3/4" "stringers" run fore and aft, then what went over them? Keep in mind there are only 5 screw holes, port and starboard, in the same place. If thin boards were fastened to the stringers, they would have to run side to side, or perpendicular to the keelson. There is not too much curvature in the floor shape here, so would it make much difference if the floorboards didn't run fore and aft? Any suggestions and ideas would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
     

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  2. gggGuest
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    gggGuest ...

  3. gggGuest
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    gggGuest ...

    Had a bit of a look in my Uffa Fox books. Can't see any lapstrake i14s from the 30s, all look Carvel built.
    Floorboard arrangements are only sketchily recorded and vary appreciably, but most seem to have longitudinal boards over only the area alongside the seats. This seems typical.

    http://s535.photobucket.com/user/acraigbennett/media/scan0004.jpg.html?t=1247226192

    What's under the boards is hard to say.

    Have you come across this blog: http://cbifda.blogspot.co.uk/ . Looks as if it could be useful to you.
     
  4. Richard Woods
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    I14's in the US were often clinker. There is one that I've seen, near Seattle. Otherwise I agree, the UK ones, especially the Fox built boats, were carvel

    RW
     
  5. guam2250
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    guam2250 Junior Member

    Apparently, Canadian built I-14's before the war were often clinker built. My mission was to reverse engineer the floor boards. All I have are the 3/4" marks, every 2-1/2" on each rib as shown in the photos. There are only 5 screw holes, symetrically port and starboard in the existing ribs. The question is what went on top of the 3/4" pieces???? - MGM
     
  6. Richard Woods
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

  7. gggGuest
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    gggGuest ...

    The only photo of the interior of a Canadian 14 in the Uffa books (and a carvel built one) *appears* to show longitudinal boards as in the drawing I linked. The image isn't very clear though. The Canadian boats in the mid 30s, BTW had canvas foredecks in two halves with a zip fastener on the centreline. I thought it seemed awfully early to be using zip fasteners for something like that, but the book was published in 1936, so must be right!
     
  8. Steve Clark
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    Steve Clark Charged Particle

    Fox boats were double planked with a layer of oiled silk between the two layers.
    Very likely nothing was on top of the for and aft "stringers."
    They actually were were the floorboards effectively the same way the seat tops are built out of slats.
    Spacing would be about right. Fore and aft orientation would help footing. Would even out point loading of feet on the skin, which could split the planks or start a seam. I am assuming that the planking is very light and wouldn't take kindly to being stomped on.
    SHC
     
  9. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Typically these "slats" are installed over cleats, which rest on the "hard points" of each frame. The hard points are the contact areas where the ribs fall on the laps. If the cleats landed anywhere else, the frame is floating and unsupported, which will cause the cleats and attached slats to move a bit when stepped on, as well as bend the unsupported areas of the frames, between lap landings. The slat/cleat assembly wasn't usually fastened, but often had a pivoting "dog" of some sort at each end, to keep them in the boat. They were intended to be easily removed for cleaning and storage. They were also quite lightly built. The cleats commonly were 3/4" square stock, screw from below to the slats, so no fastener heads were seen from above.

    Because the cleat marks on the frames are longitudinal, this has me thinking a grating was used instead. This would be heavier than a traditional slat arrangement and not that common on a day boat, but certainly possible. Generally, longitudinal slats are prefered for good footing, but some do like grates.
     
  10. guam2250
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    guam2250 Junior Member

    Thanks for all the input. The main problem is that there are only 5 screw holes in the existing ribs. In the photos, I put Q-TIPs in the screw holes to make them visible. The screws are in exactly the same place port and starboard. That few fastners says some self-supporting structure. A grate could work or short, thin boards fastened perpendicular to the fore and aft cleats(runners, stringers??). The hull is fairly flat here, but still, side to side is not typical. The taped marks left by the cleats, did not all land on the "hard points" due to the spacing. ??????? -MGM
     
  11. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I don't understand your needs. The I-14 was a highly developed one design, that likely had as many sole configurations as you can possibly dream up. I've seen slats screwed to the frames, though more often they were more easily removed (dogs). Sometimes over cleats, as well as many variations. Trying to figure out what was there before, may not accurately represent anything more, than what the last owner devised for her. In her life, I'll bet several configuration where employed. Fill the screw holes, as they weaken ribs, which is why they were usually dogged.
     
  12. guam2250
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    guam2250 Junior Member

    Was just trying to keep it original. And I agree, being a developmental class, there were no rules about the sole configuration. None of the photos I've seen have been the same. Given the minimal scantlings, I will keep any fastenings out of the ribs. Thanks for your expertise. - MGM
     
  13. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The usual way the slats are dogged down is a swiveling button or cam sort of thing, attached to the underside of the forward and aft end of the slat assembly. It was turned about 90 degrees to catch under one of the rib gaps. The slats simply rested on the ribs, or on cleats, which rested on the ribs. Cleats and slats are fastened together, but the assembly simply locked into place. I've also seen some clever wedge like arrangements, where the ends of the slat assembly had a captive wedge that bore against the ribs. I've never liked this approuch, thinking it could torque a rib sideways off it's clenches from repeated wedging. Whatever you come up with, think light and simple, which would be typical for this class. Lastly, closely examine the ribs, especially at the turn of the bilge in the aft quarters. Check the ribs for fair and sweet curves in these areas. Any kinks or discontinuous curves, are indications of tension cracks in the ribs, which can go unseen. This is a common problem on dainty framed lapstrakes. You may also consider "rebucking" the clenches, which can tighten up the structure, if the clenches aren't too corroded, metal fatigued or have "egged" out their holes.
     
  14. CT249
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    CT249 Senior Member

    With respect, Par, the I-14 was not, is not, and will almost certainly never be a "one design". It's a development class.
     

  15. guam2250
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    guam2250 Junior Member

    I like the less invasive "dogged down" idea. Thanks Now on to some equipment questions. Being an overpowered design, this boat had no cleats for the sheets. The jib sheets come through a sliding track car fairlead only. The mainsheet comes through a single block on top of the centerboard trunk and then around a double, vertical bronze winch. The smaller top section rotates one way(main sheet?) and the taller bottom section, while tapered, is stationary(jib sheet?). Which is which? Under the middle thwart, on the starboard side of the centerboard trunk, is a cylindrical, spring loaded cleat. A thin braided (3/16") line runs from a turning block(I don't think being wrapped around winch is correct, bit not sure), through the center of the cleat, forward to another turning block at the base of the stem, and then up through a hole in the bronze bow fitting. There is a nice loop seized into the end of the line. The oneway cleat has an aft tube, that when pulled, releases the line to be payed out forward. Releasing the tube lets it snap back and locks the line. The bracket holding the cleat in place is rusty steel. Seems out of place on a boat. ????? Any ideas on pourpose of this thin line? Jib downhaul or spinaker halyard?? Again, all the input is very helpful. Thanks - MGM
     

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    Last edited: Sep 29, 2016
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