Vikings, travel evidence

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by Knut Sand, Dec 23, 2010.

  1. Knut Sand
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    Knut Sand Senior Member

  2. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

  3. Petros
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    Petros Senior Member

    There is lots of evidence of Viking presence in North America, both historical (written) and archaeological (artifacts). That article speculates that the Viking may have brought back a native American wife who had children based on some DNA evidence found in Iceland.

    It turns out that many ancient peoples have moved around over great distances. There is some evidence that an extended clan of Chinese refugees made it to the west coast of North American (near the current Mexico/USA border). And what appears to be Jewish burial sites (with Hebrew inscriptions) dating from the late first century were found in Ohio. Could have been a group fleeing the Romans after the fall of Jerusalem.

    What I find most interesting is the Old Celtic inscription from the 8th century found in a West Virgina cave. The translation clearly indicates who ever wrote this was celebrating Christmas (the Nativity of Christ) as a Christian. This supports the idea that St. Brendan the Navigator on a missionary journey in the 8th century sailed to North America. The voyage was thought to be legend until an Adventurer named Severin duplicated the trip to prove it could have been done. And now the Celtic Christian inscription found in the 1980s seems to support the journey of St. Branden.

    700 years before Columbus, 400 years before Eric the Red and the Vikings, Irish Christian monks made the journey in skin boats, and made it back to Ireland.

    See the link below:

    http://www.neara.org/mulligan/wvpetroglyphs.htm
     
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  4. cthippo
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    cthippo Senior Member

    The significance of Columbus was that he was the first to make it stick. Everyone visited and then either left or dies off.
     
  5. Ike
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    Ike Senior Member

    Veri interesting article. Those vikings sure got around. There is evidence of them all over Europe, Asia and Africa. We know for certain the got to North America, and love knows no boundaries. So they liked the local ladies (that is, when the locals weren't tryingto kill them, which is why they left N. A.) Of course there is always the possibility that she was not a willing participant.
     
  6. Knut Sand
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    Knut Sand Senior Member

    Monks? Then we'll probably not be able to trace the DNA of the contacts they could've made.... :D
     
  7. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    Irish monks clung to marriage a lot longer than you might think; at least up into the 1100's.

    And they definitely got around. Here's an excerpt from a Wikipedia article about Culdee monks:

    The Icelandic Landnámabók (Book of Settlements) mentions that the Norse found Irish priests with bells and crosiers in Iceland when they arrived. This is also hinted at in the works of Dicuil. The Norse called the priests papar, a name found as an element in many placenames of Orkney, Shetland, the Faroes and Iceland. The traditional accounts state that the papar left when the Norse arrived. It has been suggested that their influence may have helped Christianity spread in Iceland but it is by no means clear that the papar were Culdee monks.


    Irish monks also founded monasteries in Germany, including one at Cologne.
     
  8. murdomack
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    murdomack New Member

    I think people have always ventured over their horizons but that so much of their history disappeared in the murderous 2nd Millenium.
    From the Icelandic sagas we learn't of Lief Erikson's journey to America and the remains of their settlement there is now well known. The knowledge of the land to the west of Greenland came to them through one of their ships being blown off couse in a storm and the crew seeing what was probably Labrador. Erikson used the same ship on his expedition "because it knew the way".
    There is no fore-knowledge mentioned of the land to the west, which one would have expected if the Irish had been there earlier, as the Vikings and the Celts had long since been mixing. Erikson himself is now thought to have lived in the Hebrides for some years before his discovery of America, married there and had a son born there.
     
  9. viking north
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    viking north VINLAND

    I started a thread last week which would have gotten into this but for some reason can't find my thread. The problem with history is that there is too much speculation on unproven theorys, in most cases it distorts real history and can do more harm than good in discovering the truth by creating false leads and if stated enough it replaces the truth. There is absolutely no proof that the chinese, or the irish monks, visited north or south america prior to the Vikings,( other than the Siberians and the Iberians our present day native people) There is also no proof that the vikings visited or settled any further south than their settlement in Northern Newfoundland. All claims of them having visited or settled in other southern areas have been proven hoaxes. Speculation is not solid history it's quazi, it's ego, it's in many cases overpatriotic political hog wash. I also question the National Geographic Newfoundland viking settlement time table, the Vikings inital stay in their Newfoundland settlement lasted some 35yrs. but they re visited the site over a period of some 150yrs.(from memory will confirm and correct after checking my viking ref. collection). The other point mentioned was, that the exact genetic market doesn't match that found in any american indian today shouldn't be a mystery because the unique tribe from which the dna marker came from is now extinct. These being the native tribe of Newfoundland, the Beothuck. This tribe is a total mystery tribe as even their language according to the top linguists of the U.S. is not related to any other North American native language. it has recently been confirmed that in addition to the Siberian migration via the Bering ice shelf there was also an Atlantic crossing migration via the frozen ice bridge from Europe, from the Iberian Pen. to be exact. This has been confirmed over time by first Skull shapes,the Clovis spear point, native artic travel distances, and most recent genetic markers from a anchient tribe in present day Spain showing up in eastern north american natives. By the way this same tribe is credited as most likely being the inventors of the clovis point. Now if the experts could do further dna testing maybe hey'll find out the Beothuck were the reminents of the Iberian migrators and they will have found their mystery, missing native dna thats showing up in the Icelantic peoples. I do not speculate that this is the case it's just a lead worth following.--- Geo.
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2011
  10. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

    http://www.workingdogweb.com/Pottery.htm

    "The earliest pottery found in Canada was made some 3,500 years ago at a site in the northern Yukon near the Arctic Ocean. This Paleoeskimo pottery is believed to be inspired by Siberian ceramics. Thus, while the Dorset peoples to the east are not using pottery, the new technology is beginning to arrive. About 2,500 years ago, pottery making arrived in southeastern Canada from the eastern United States."
     
  11. viking north
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    viking north VINLAND

    Hoyte, just goes to show the odd paths technology travels. Two of the most fastenating tribes of our early native settlers are the agricultural peoples of the lower mid west and their huge farms and the (shell) "Mound" people of the eastern seaboard. Both of these existing long before the second wave of in migration in 1492. My faded memory seems to recall it was from these latter sites that European shaped skulls were discovered which triggered a possible suspected migration from other than Siberia. This new scientifically backed Iberian migration across the frozen Atlantic, is throwing the early peoples theory on it's ears with many not willing to fully accept it yet. This is not a bad thing as it leads to futher gathering of info that in turn could turn up entirely new evidence. The hot spots today for this seems to be in south america. Fantastic and interesting stuff and has been a hobby of mine for many years--Geo.
     

  12. viking north
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    viking north VINLAND

    I think that was the Native Indian that Eric and the boys took back to Iceland via Greenland of course to climatise her first as can be seen by the winter skins she is wearing. I can now understand why the Icelanders are trying to find and revive her genetic code. However on closer inspection looks like the monks branded her first.-Geo
     
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