Vibratory System

Discussion in 'Hydrodynamics and Aerodynamics' started by gonzo, Jul 25, 2018.

  1. MikeJohns
    Joined: Aug 2004
    Posts: 3,173
    Likes: 198, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 2054
    Location: Australia

    MikeJohns Senior Member

    Last edited: Aug 6, 2018
  2. MikeJohns
    Joined: Aug 2004
    Posts: 3,173
    Likes: 198, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 2054
    Location: Australia

    MikeJohns Senior Member

    Barking up the wrong tree isn't an insult the way the English use it. It just a more colloquial term of you are looking at this from the wrong perspective.
     
  3. Ad Hoc
    Joined: Oct 2008
    Posts: 5,933
    Likes: 317, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 2488
    Location: Japan

    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    The wonders of Google translate eh? :D:D
     
  4. rxcomposite
    Joined: Jan 2005
    Posts: 1,885
    Likes: 145, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1110
    Location: Philippines

    rxcomposite Senior Member

    "BARKING up the wrong tree" is a common English idiom/idiomatic expression.
     
  5. MikeJohns
    Joined: Aug 2004
    Posts: 3,173
    Likes: 198, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 2054
    Location: Australia

    MikeJohns Senior Member

    I had two engineers seconded to me from Teraoka in Japan for a ship loading project where they were designing and implementing the weight recording machinery and electronics. Neither of us shared anything other than a few social phrases. Our communication was based on sketches, drawings symbols and equations, and despite my reservations it was more than adequate, because we we all spoke the same language where it mattered. The project was finished under budget and under time after they went back to japan and built their bit. I've often thought a tool like google translate ( it was prior to that) would have actually had the opposite effect and lead to infinite confusion. A few years later I had an email which read something along the lines of "Hello are you still being honest with your machine we would welcome to be honest with you again"
     
    rwatson likes this.
  6. TANSL
    Joined: Sep 2011
    Posts: 5,546
    Likes: 160, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 300
    Location: Spain

    TANSL Senior Member

    In any language, there are totally normal expressions that are bad sounds, which apply to people but show contempt for them, which are bad manners and that people, although they know them, do not use them in certain forums. It seems clear, then, that saying that a person barks, in English, can not be taken as contempt and that, in any case, it is accepted in environments in which people respect each other. I wonder if there is no expression that allows to say that Gonzo is wrong, without saying that he behaves like a dog. Maybe Google's automatic translator is pushing me to respect people a little more.:D:D
    I apologize to everyone for trying, what I think it is, to respect Gonzo. I thought that this person was given a treatment of an animal. I'm sorry, I see now that it was an expression, I'm not going to say affectionate, but almost.
    :):) Google translator tells me that this expression may be to my liking
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2018
  7. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 7,387
    Likes: 232, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

  8. BMcF
    Joined: Mar 2007
    Posts: 964
    Likes: 44, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 361
    Location: Maryland

    BMcF Senior Member

    LOL. Some years back, I was providing some classroom training to a bunch of Korean shipyard technicians on various aspects of our marine equipment we delivered. After one particularly technical session was completed, I decided it would be a good idea to canvas the group and get some calibration of their level of understanding. The response from the senior man, and designated spokesman, was classic for it's politeness: "Yes Mr. Bill, we understand. But please explain".

    That line entered eternally in to our company'e internal phrase lexicon and is still used to this day by some of the older hands to let me know that my direction is inadequate or confusing. ;-)
     
    MikeJohns likes this.
  9. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 3,817
    Likes: 153, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 971
    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

    Here is an explanation for the term...
    bark up the wrong tree
    pursue a mistaken or misguided line of thought or course of action. informal
    The metaphor is of a dog that has mistaken the tree in which its quarry has taken refuge and is barking at the foot of the wrong one.

    Here is another example of the meaning of something lost in translation....
     
    MikeJohns likes this.
  10. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 13,342
    Likes: 325, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    The classic balloon example is to show that springs can have many physical configurations. The weight of the string is enough to keep the balloon from flying away. When the balloon is disturbed, in moves up and down. The length of the spring changes, and so does the tension. Disregarding damping, the tension (force on the balloon from the string) varies according to F=kx, which makes it a spring. I can post without insulting. I would like to see you do the same instead of lowering yourself to the level of uneducated tweets.
     
  11. TANSL
    Joined: Sep 2011
    Posts: 5,546
    Likes: 160, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 300
    Location: Spain

    TANSL Senior Member

    And when the dog keeps barking at the wrong tree, how do you say in English that it is preferable for it to shut up?
    (unfortunately Google translator, in this, it does not help me much, it does not have "normal" but little educated expressions.)
     
  12. Ad Hoc
    Joined: Oct 2008
    Posts: 5,933
    Likes: 317, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 2488
    Location: Japan

    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Oh dear…back to sPrings again.

    So, please explain how a piece of sTring when it is laying on the ground and/or compressed can thus provide a restoring force ergo has a sPring stiffness associated with it. Which if you are an engineer, you would know is the definition of a sPring.

    Oh, and because it has oscillatory motion does not = sPring.
    Because, again, if you are an engineer you'd know it is simply defined as the motion of a particle whose acceleration is always directed towards a fixed point.
    Nowt about sPrings.

    Then as Mike keeps asking you please draw the free body diagram for this balloon. Or are you unable to because one is not provided in the paper?

    Hint, the clue lies with eqn.2a/b and 9a/b.

    Then explain where the forces are on a catenary using a free body diagram and compare the two.

    No one is being insulting, unless you personally feel your intelligence is being questioned because you cannot explain your lack of understanding. Then that is your own interpretation of the statement – a subjective one. Engineering has no emotions, only facts!
     
  13. MikeJohns
    Joined: Aug 2004
    Posts: 3,173
    Likes: 198, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 2054
    Location: Australia

    MikeJohns Senior Member

    "Oh Come on Gonzo" for crying out loud, that's not a free body diagram the arrows show displacement . It's a conceptual sketch. There's only one force input and that's horizontal and the chain lifts, savvy?
    Think of it as an inclined plane except the tension vector is the ramp.

    I keep telling you to sketch the free body diagrams and you can leave out the forces that cancel out. What are you left with ?

    In this case it's an external force input (say due to a constant wind ) and a tension vector at the attachment point to the floating body. Everything else cancels, not that it's irrelevant in the action of the catenary it just cancels in the free body diagram at steady state.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2018
  14. rxcomposite
    Joined: Jan 2005
    Posts: 1,885
    Likes: 145, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1110
    Location: Philippines

    rxcomposite Senior Member

    Not in google but in YouTube. It says "shut the **** up". I guess it depends on how you find the translator.
     

  15. rxcomposite
    Joined: Jan 2005
    Posts: 1,885
    Likes: 145, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1110
    Location: Philippines

    rxcomposite Senior Member

    Tansl- Spanish also has a lot of idiomatic expressions. Pedir peras al olmo - ‘To ask the elm tree for pears’ seems to be close to "barking at the wrong tree", or something more insulting like No saber ni jota de algo - ‘Not to know even the letter j about something’ . Or something more direct "No sabe ni jota de Inglés." He doesn’t know the first thing about English. I'm sure you can come up with something.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.