using oilpaint on deck?

Discussion in 'Materials' started by urisvan, Feb 23, 2018.

  1. urisvan
    Joined: Nov 2005
    Posts: 220
    Likes: 5, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 53
    Location: istanbul

    urisvan Senior Member

    Hello
    i was using interdeck as deckpaint. it is a good paint but also needs new painting after two maximum three years.
    can i use a quality oil paint instead of interdeck? and if i can what granules should i use as untislippery material. one of my friend suggested "filter material" like little stones used in carbon filters.

    Regards
    Ulas
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 467, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    All of the major paint manufactures offer "particulates" that can be broadcast or mixed with the paint, to provide texture. Use one of these, not "filler materials" Stones and other heavy particulates will just get knocked out of the paint with regular foot traffic. In fact, using particulates isn't the best way to get texture, simply because it wears off quickly.

    As to which paint, well any paint will do, but the use of particulates will dramatically lower it's durability as a coating. A much better way to get texture is to cast or other wise plan for it on the deck, before any coatings go on. To this end, you can paint the deck, repeatedly, without having to remove the texture and if you have to, you can use a chemical stripper to remove paint, but the texture remains. This requires some extra prep, such as taping off waterways, around hardware, etc., but does produce a much more professional looking result.

    This deck has the texture in place and eventually was painted. No particulates to fall or get kicked off, as it's part of the epoxy coating. The same can be done on any deck, regardless of resin system employed.
    81.jpg
     
  3. urisvan
    Joined: Nov 2005
    Posts: 220
    Likes: 5, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 53
    Location: istanbul

    urisvan Senior Member

    Thank you Par,

    Actually i saw my friend's boat deck who suggests me using filter particals and they were very good, nothing was falling apart and he was just painting it every year or so. Unfortunately i did't ask details and i dont have his contacts
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 467, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Particulates can work, but repainting fills the voids, eventually requiring it to be removed wholesale, which is bittch. It's usually difficult to get a regular, purely random pattern, if the particulates are mixed with the paint. The broadcast method of application works better in the regard. Lastly, they do kick out in use, hence my recommendation for making the texture part of the substrate coatings, as these can remain even if you have to chemically removed the paint later in life.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2018
  5. urisvan
    Joined: Nov 2005
    Posts: 220
    Likes: 5, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 53
    Location: istanbul

    urisvan Senior Member

    the method you suggest is very good.
    but on the other hand i think using a good oilpaint with sand in it will do the same job as interdeck does.
    anyway in one year or two the particules in the interdeck kick out as well. so i need to paint it again even the condition of the paint is good because it is not antislippery anymore.

    regards
    Ulas
     
  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 467, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Interdeck is a single part modified polyurethane, not a straight alkyd (oil), so it will be tougher and more durable. The alkyds will toss their particulates much sooner than the harder and more tenacious polyurethanes, so your assumption about simply repainting every year or so is incorrect. Additionally, every layer of paint you put on will fill in the texture more, making it less aggressive. If you apply more particulate laden paint, it will be sticking to a less than desirable surface, further reducing it's durability and longevity.
     
  7. urisvan
    Joined: Nov 2005
    Posts: 220
    Likes: 5, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 53
    Location: istanbul

    urisvan Senior Member

    I was thinking to put sand in oil paint and paint with it. And after one year sand it (i think it will not be too difficult because the sand mostly will be gone) so achive a stable surface and paint again.
     

  8. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 467, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Again, particulates will eat the paint, under foot traffic. There's no way to avoid this unless you simply don't use the boat. Particulates, regardless of how applied or what they're made from will all do this.

    Consider elastomeric roof paint as an option that is much longer lived. Truck bed liner paint is also another option.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.