Using a donor boat for a build

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by DavidAD, Nov 9, 2015.

  1. DavidAD
    Joined: May 2015
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    Location: Guatemala

    DavidAD Junior Member

    Hi,

    I'm planning on building my own 32ft trimaran but I'm on a limited budget and would like to save where possible.

    I just wanted to ask if it's possible to salvage any marine equipment without affecting there performance or lifespan.
    Things like
    • Wind/depth/speed displays-instruments
    • Winches
    • Roller furling
    • blocks/cars/etc
    • pressure water systems
    • windlass
    • gps/compass
    • Other integrated systems I dont know or remember

    I didn't Iist the obvious like dinghy, anchor, Stove, etc. I would really like to know if that a $6000 boat with standard stuff is worth a buy just for the equipment. Not taking into account the sails though. As well cushions, head, and other things I'd rather get new.

    Really don't know if it's possible without affecting the equipment and thought that there's no better place to ask when in doubt.

    Happy sailing! :D :D

    David Divas
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Electronics are usually not worth it, unless they were installed rather recently. Salvaged equipment will always have a shorter lifespan and performance than the same new. You should also add the extra labor and disposal cost to the $6000. If you are referring to a 32 foot boat for parts, the price is quite high.
     
  3. DavidAD
    Joined: May 2015
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    Location: Guatemala

    DavidAD Junior Member

    I've researched it quite a bit and most well equipped boats come in at around a ballpark of $6000. Most of these boats have inverters, generators, outboards that come with it (that's kinda my def. for standard). Just that the deal breaker are the instruments as a few come with multifunction displays or tridata instruments, etc. Mostly from 2010+. As ill most likely break even with that.

    I'd also like to ask if uninstalling & reinstalling would affect it by any means. And if any of the other items I mentioned are worth salvaging.

    Forgot to mention that I'll be doing the dirty work and disposing of the boat would be as simple as donating it with sails, anchor, stuff I don't salvage to a child orphanage near by.

    I don't know if I'm understanding you correctly but yes the parts are for a 32ft trimaran.

    Thanks for the reply! David D
     
  4. DavidAD
    Joined: May 2015
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    Location: Guatemala

    DavidAD Junior Member

    Here's an example of the average donor boat I'm mentioning.

    http://m.sailboatlistings.com/view/53718

    Now in no way am I destroying the boat, she will still have life after with non fortunate kids. I won't take the sails, anchor, rigging, cushions, etc. Just the stuff that I need.
     
  5. W9GFO
    Joined: Dec 2014
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    Location: Olalla, WA

    W9GFO Senior Member

    Just an opinion, you would be better off salvaging the stuff off a boat that has no life left or scaling back your equipment requirements to meet your budget. Stripping a good boat of it's electronics and equipment will make it next to worthless.

    Ability to re-use the stuff will depend upon how skillfully it is transplanted. Generally people aren't all that careful when removing gear. If ever someone wanted to bring the boat back up to date it would be a huge job. Cut wires, plumbing and holes where things used to be - ugh!

    How would the orphanage use a stripped boat, make a playhouse? That's a serious question, not being flippant. If you take the winches, roller furling, instruments, blocks etc. off of it then they can't really use it.
     
  6. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    That was my first thought too about the orphanage. Seems like a bad thing to do to children in need: giving them a garbage boat they will have to spend time and money to dispose of.
     
  7. DavidAD
    Joined: May 2015
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    Location: Guatemala

    DavidAD Junior Member

    Sorry for the late reply, I've been a little busy lately..

    And yeah I know it sounds like a really bad idea just giving them a "junk boat" but the problem here in Guatemala is that NO government or local "charity" can be 100% trusted due to high rates of corruption and greed. It's much harder to sell a boat with less than standard equipment and I personally kind of see that as a plus. I'd rather donate a hard to sell stripped boat, than the equivalent $6000.That's around Q46000, about 2-5 years worth of income for poor families here, they usually get paid less than minimum wage here. And that would be a 1 year 1/2 of the minimum here. I wouldn't dare donate that in cash as they can't be trusted in my opinion as there's always someone in the chain that likes to give themselves a pay bonus.

    It wouldn't really matter to these kids if it was a gunboat or a wooden dinghy, they really don't have anything and would be happy either way. Casa Guatemala has a orphanage right next to Rio Dulce, it wouldn't be a bad playhouse for them if you think about it. They'd still have the anchors, sails, interior, etc in tact. And getting a boat that still has life in her would be a plus for them as it would last longer. I'd like to get a boat near the end but transportation costs are also kinda prohibitive.

    I would love to actually be able to do more for them but the salary I get isn't exactly the best and they are quite far from the Capital to do any volunteer work. My equipment has been scaled back to the minimum already, I would just resale the equipment I deem unnecessary to me to break even. That would be everything except basic nav gear, solar panels, batteries, blocks, etc. But by the looks of it, it's not going to be a great idea. Thanks for all the replies and opinions. I really appreciate your input on this!
     
  8. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    A stripped boat is not hard to sell, but impossible. That is why you are giving it away. It is a really lousy thing to do.
     
  9. philSweet
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Beaufort, SC and H'ville, NC

    philSweet Senior Member

  10. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    A boat is defined as a enclosed space that keeps water out, so you can place valuables within it, while on the water. Simply put, a striped boat is a receptacle for the engine(s), controls, electronics, hardware, etc. and without these things, you have an empty shell of little value. If it's a trailer borne boat, the trailer has some value, but if there's no trailer, the boat is only worth what is installed on or in it. This doesn't seem fair, but is the marketing truth of used boats.
     

  11. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    Sail boats operated for a few thousand years with out much of todays hardware .

    Multiple blocks are not as much fun as two speed self tailers , but one could sail forever with old fashoned gear.

    To give the boat away , just make sure ALL the gear is there so the boat can be uded , sailed enjoyed.

    Pretend its 1800 when you outfit it as a donor.
     
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