Uscg Coi

Discussion in 'Class Societies' started by wcnfl, Feb 3, 2010.

  1. wcnfl
    Joined: Jan 2010
    Posts: 34
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Florida

    wcnfl Junior Member

    I have a customer that needs a COI on a boat that he is going to use for a dive business...16 passangers...The boats I sell are already built...any idea on how and what the cost might be to get a completed boat COI?

    Thanks
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 14,352
    Likes: 619, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Are you looking for a chapter 7 COI?
     
  3. wcnfl
    Joined: Jan 2010
    Posts: 34
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Florida

    wcnfl Junior Member

    What is Chapter 7?

    The boat is 28' LOA, 9 1/2' Beam, 6400 lbs, 500 hp and will be used in coastal waters carrying 16 passengers...
     
  4. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 14,352
    Likes: 619, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    That's the chapter in the regulations. There are several people in Florida that could do the paperwork and design the modifications. For example, the watertight bulkheads, bilge pump location and acces, etc.
    http://www.sponbergyachtdesign.com/
     
  5. mark775

    mark775 Guest

    Chapter 7 is the chapter in WHAT regulations - Bankruptcy?
    Wcnfl, the regulations are in 46CFR Subchapter "T". That's "Code of Federal Regulations". The boats certified under these regulations are commonly refered to as "T" Boats but that is ambiguous. A more descriptive term is "inspected" boat and that is sometimes misused, as well. In any event, typically, every aspect of the boat is "inspected" from start to finish. It can be done on a completed boat but is cumbersome and time consuming. The regulations address everything from how your bulkheads are tabbed in to what kind of resin is used - on a completed boat, that means burn tests of hull laminate sample from the boat in question (not a sister unless you get the builder involved, as well, and he writes a letter of equivalency). If you already have tanks installed, you are probably going to have to remove them or prove that they are appropriate thickness and have no more than 30" baffles. Your railing will have to be "40 inches unless you can demonstrate a need for less, then they can be 30", with all other vessels having at least 36" railing." (that is the kind of wording you will need to sort thu). Your tanks will need a pressure test. You do not tell them the number of passengers and route - the inspecor will tell you. In short, unless you are intending to go into the business of "T" boats, miss this sale or charge the guy your time for dozens of letters, conversations, modifications, dinking around on stuff you may not want to. The boat may not even be reasonably "inspectable" - What is it? I have done this entire process myself and it is no mean feat. Oh, one last thing...The regulations are entended to be interpreted - there is some wording somewhere that addresses "equivalencies". What this means to you is that one inspector will have a hard-on for wiring and require you to get rid of all those soldered connections, connections that are not in junction boxes, wires less than 14gauge, so many strands, not marine rated, etc., and another inspector wants to see ACTUAL tabbing of stringers, that bunks are 7', that you have a 2/3 full alarm on your holding tank and machinery guards. In other words, you don't know WHAT you are getting into. I would lean towards some inspector in a very busy port that has done tons of these before - You DO NOT want a small town inspector learning at the same time as you because it drags out the process and involves more people. Good luck. I expect to see you post one of these in a month:
    certificate-of-inspection-star-spirit-1.jpg
     
  6. mark775

    mark775 Guest

    Also, don't hire a naval architect that does not specialize in this. You do not want to be paying for him to learn, either.
     
  7. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
    Posts: 2,373
    Likes: 262, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1669
    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member

    If these boats are already built it would be cheaper for you to start from scratch with a new design and build the boat from the keel up. Normally persons building inspected vessels submit plans to the Marine Safety Office that has jurisdiction in their area. In Florida that would be either Miami, Tampa or Jacksonville. Afetr the plans are approved, with necessary changes, then the boat is routinely inspected as it is being built. After the boat is finished a final inspection is done and the boat is certified to carry passengers for hire.

    You seriously need to contact the USCG. Look here and find out who you need to talk to. http://www.uscg.mil/d7/sectMiami/dept_inspection.asp
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2010
  8. mark775

    mark775 Guest

    Just three MSDs in Florida. Good then - which one is nicest to deal with and does he get a choice or is it where his home or hailing port is?
     
  9. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
    Posts: 2,373
    Likes: 262, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1669
    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member

    It usually where the boat is built that determines which office handles it. Frankly, no you don't get to shop for an MSO, unless you decide to build the boat there.
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. mark775

    mark775 Guest

    One thing that has always bothered me about it is the "open to interpretation" aspect of equivalencies. There is no doubt that some MSDs are incredibly more difficult than others (I had an inspector once ask me "What should I be looking at?").
    Same thing with licensing... I worked my *** off and learned every word in Chapman's and most in Boditch... a guy is needed on a mud boat in Louisiana and he is signed seatime and given a "group test". Some of the best boat handlers in the world but if they can't see the platform to which they are going, they are lost! There should be a set of rules - PERIOD.
    Seattle is historically much tougher than Portland, BTW.
     
  11. Doug Lord
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 16,651
    Likes: 322, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 1362
    Location: Cocoa, Florida

    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    ==========================
    Call Bob White at IMANNA Laboratory in Rockledge ,Fl: 321-632-2008.
    He will definitely be able to help you. www.imanna.com
    -----
    Bob is sick today but try next week-he'll point you in the right direction.
     
  12. mark775

    mark775 Guest

    My guess is that the salesman will probably miss this sale - unless a glutton for punishment!
     

  13. wcnfl
    Joined: Jan 2010
    Posts: 34
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Florida

    wcnfl Junior Member

    10-4 on that...I will miss this sale

    I'm on the west coast of Florida and see dozen of boats...that carry passangers for hire...Site Seeing, Shelling, Sunsets, Diving, Fishing...some look like a heavy duty pontoon boats...I would have never thought all these boats passed such a rigorous inspections.

    You learn something new everyday!

    Thanks everyone for the advise. I'm going to pass on this one!
     
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.