Unusually built?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Salmoneyes, Sep 5, 2018.

  1. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    SamSam Senior Member

    Maybe this is it...

    Frames First or Plating First? http://www.kastenmarine.com/frames_first.htm
     
  2. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    I always thought the problem with pits wasn't so much lost strength as pinhole leaks.
    Is the bulkhead art original?
     
  3. JSL
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    JSL Senior Member

    The epoxy will not bring strength back but it can protect the material you have.
     
  4. Salmoneyes
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    Salmoneyes Junior Member

    It is, and funny thing is it looks a bit like me.... I would love to leave it, but i will be be blasting everything....

    Ive done a couple of 100 year old home remodels and I have found similar things left behind by the builders which would never be seen without demolition.... Very cool of them...
     
  5. Salmoneyes
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    Salmoneyes Junior Member

    I tend to lean that direction as well. I have however seen examples of of jet pump stators being rebuilt with epoxy and diamond lath that lasted longer than the original but I believe the strength came from the diamond lath.

    I would be very reluctant to add cloth or lath to the exterior of the hull, and I would have to see some examples of longevity from inside applications. The big issue for me is that the technology is advancing in the compounds, and they are to new to been out in the field long enough to have a proven track record.
     
  6. Salmoneyes
    Joined: Sep 2018
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    Salmoneyes Junior Member

    Thank You!!!!!
    This is what I was hoping for when I posted this.... I thought I had read everything from Kasten, but missed this... I won't waste a lot of time in this post with all the details since I have another thread about the specifics in the metal boat building section, but if it were determined that it was some whack construction thing, I would be disappointed. As it is, I am considering modifying it, but weight is a big issue im trying to resolve and adding a bunch of interior framing is counter productive..
    Thanks Again
     
  7. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

  8. BMcF
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    BMcF Senior Member

    That looks remarkably similar in construction detail to a Dutch-built steel trawler we've got sitting outside our facilities undergoing a refit. Lots of rust had to be removed from the bilges so they could be treated and epoxy painted.
     
  9. Salmoneyes
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    Salmoneyes Junior Member

    Id be interested in photos....
     
  10. BMcF
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    BMcF Senior Member

    I'll get you a few. The aftmost part of the bilge is completely open (we removed the aft deck plating and fuel tanks; all that going back in new) and next up for the derusting process, so it's easy to get to.
     
  11. Salmoneyes
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    Salmoneyes Junior Member

  12. goodwilltoall
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    goodwilltoall Senior Member

    Contrary to my previous thoughts and understanding at the time, this boat lacking chines and longs along with rusty and thin plating to begin with, would make me very hesitant to take it out in any rough weather. Even the small frames that are there are not even connected.
     
  13. Salmoneyes
    Joined: Sep 2018
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    Salmoneyes Junior Member

    I agree with your assessment, however that was never our intention. It was our original intention to buy a good, sound hull, and rebuild all mechanical, plumbing, electrical, and interior plus everything top side. It just happened that we found a boat that has been getting prepped for cruising with all new everything, except no one ever looked below the sole. I have a substantial budget, and the plan is to rebuild this hull with new plating where it is called for, and any modifications will be engineer approved.
    The main concern, and what prompted the original post, was that I was unfamiliar with this type of construction and was worried that the hull was poorly built (despite the beautiful welds) which could potentially force me to build a new hull from scratch and reuse all he new components. My wife and I plan to move aboard when she is completed, and ultimately travel the world over the next 10 years... We need a rock solid, long lasting boat, that we know every inch of intimately...
     
  14. JSL
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    JSL Senior Member

    I think 'Goodwilltoall's assessment is pretty accurate. I saw a similar 'boat' some years ago: it was essentially a completed hull skin with temporary stiffening to permit shipping to the owner for completion by adding framing & 'internals' etc.
     

  15. JamesG123
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    JamesG123 Senior Member

    You should probably invest in a set of the plans then.
     
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