Unusual 'foil' stabilised tri

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by jamez, Dec 8, 2018.

  1. Doug Lord
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 16,470
    Likes: 286, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 1362
    Location: Melbourne, Florida

    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    ---------------------
    You're right.....I've got a feeling I've seen something like that-but just can't figure where....
     
  2. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
    Posts: 2,781
    Likes: 78, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 579
    Location: Ft. Worth, Tx, USA

    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Sorry for the attitude - nothing wrong with what you posted - my bad mood.
     
  3. Noel Fuller
    Joined: May 2019
    Posts: 5
    Likes: 3, Points: 3
    Location: Auckland

    Noel Fuller Junior Member

    Hi Gary! Sabrina, after many years with a small ama in motoring only config for rivers has recently ventured about in sailing mode complicated however by the addition of a 3 hp electric motor and 2 lithium batteries, an extra 20 kgm so slower but a nominal 12 hour range at 5 knots is worth having. The biggest and only real design improvement since the images you have shown is the foil on the stern which prevents the high drag suckdown of the canoe stern at speed and under motor gives a 30% increase in speed. Under sail the stern foil, counter intuitively, gives increased dynamic lift across the whole boat which served me well recently sailing from Auckland to Mangawhai downwind in a south easterly that blew for a week.

    Thus, rather short of sleep, and in very adverse conditions - at night with an outgoing tide and a substantial swell rolling right into the reputed dangerous bar, I crashed this bar April 18, 2019, being taken by three breakers during which Sabrina under full sail in a fresh breeze did not trip, yaw or veer though the third breaker submerged the hull completely, crashing down over my head . No damage was taken by the boat or me. A few moments later with the boat above water again I was in flat water and shortly after grounded off the Mangawhai Heads Holiday Park which unfortunately for me was completely full up. I spent a night in Auckland Hospital because of cellulitis in my right wrist because that cuff of my dry suit was too tight. I came back later in my Leaf and ported Sabrina back to West Auckland via Helensville. I've had to give up on the rest of this venture until days grow longer. Otherwise I'm delighted with Sabrina's stability under sail now as previous to the addition of the stern foil she was rather tender down wind tending to nose under.

    The electric motor is not designed for motor sailing which is a big downer, Sabrina under sail being capable of more than twice the speed of the motor. Nevertheless I used the motor to shorten beats into the wind and downwind when speed was within the motor's performance envelop. Otherwise it is somewhat of a hazard because of the risk of sheets catching on it, though the weight near the stern may have helped in the breakers, keeping that foil about 40-50 mm below the surface.
     
  4. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
    Posts: 2,916
    Likes: 295, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1632
    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    I've just looked up Sabrina, found her in the PDF syllabus/transcript of the Micro-Multihull Display - Lightweight Yacht Construction Symposium - on Sunday 18 September in 1983, on ca. page 15 to 18, of 52.
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2019
  5. trip the light fandango
    Joined: Apr 2018
    Posts: 211
    Likes: 37, Points: 28
    Location: Rhyll Phillip Island Victoria Australia

    trip the light fandango Senior Member

    I really enjoyed that thanks Angelique, I didn't realise that Gary Baigent was such a legend...
     
  6. Noel Fuller
    Joined: May 2019
    Posts: 5
    Likes: 3, Points: 3
    Location: Auckland

    Noel Fuller Junior Member

    Thanks. I had a paper copy but lost it. Interesting experience to read it again and have memory flashes of the scene and the other speakers as they were then.
     
  7. Gary Baigent
    Joined: Jul 2005
    Posts: 2,952
    Likes: 97, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 509
    Location: auckland nz

    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Early days (late 1970s) on Supplejack in race to Bay of Islands. Noel Fuller (peering from starboard transom in launch photograph) was aboard with a huge bag of tools ... which although horrifying (to me) because of excessive weight, became useful after expected breakages. Note painted glass wrapping around wing mast base - which came down a few days before race start and was hurriedly repaired. That's Gavin Dagley helming, we had beyond skilled sailors (and boffins) aboard,- and won all races in the following week. sopplejack copy.jpg SJlaunch.jpg
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2019

  8. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
    Posts: 2,916
    Likes: 295, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1632
    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    It popped up as an PDF for me when I looked for Sabrina info, turns out a Swedish guy who owns a Malcolm Tennant Spyder MkII has it online, as the Tennant Spyder was also discussed on the symposium, starting halfway page 10. The same Swedish guy has also a PDF online of an Multihull World article by John Macfarlane: The Malcolm Tennant Story
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2019
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.