under 20-foot, modern, light blue water cruiser?

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by scotdomergue, Nov 8, 2016.

  1. scotdomergue
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    scotdomergue Scot

    I posted this on the "design" forum and then realized it probably belongs here.

    Jack Laurent Giles designed Sopranino and Barchetta around 1950. Are there any modern equivalents? I'd like to find a design under 20 feet LOA, maximum 6 foot beam, self-righting, light weight, using modern materials and methods of construction, and I'd like to use sliding-seat rowing as auxiliary power.

    Any suggestions? Any designs I should consider?

    Thanks, Scot
     
  2. Tiny Turnip
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    Tiny Turnip Senior Member

  3. scotdomergue
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    scotdomergue Scot

    I like the Angus sail-row-cruiser, but I'm talking about a boat suitable for crossing oceans, which it really is not; note "self righting". I want light weight relative to blue-water cruising sailboats, but do NOT expect anything nearly as light as the Angus boats. I definitely want under 1000 lbs (as are Sopranino and Barchetta), but still imagine AT LEAST a couple hundred lbs. on a keel below the body of the boat.
     
  4. Tiny Turnip
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    Tiny Turnip Senior Member

    No, I thought as much Scot - I was reading your title as a cruiser for 'light blue' water, which the Angus offering might, at a push, fulfill, rather than a blue water cruiser that was light weight. It would be rightable by the removal or flooding of an ama, a la Weta, but that's not really self righting.

    Anyway - good luck with it - I've learnt that there's a limit to how scary and uncomfortable I like my sailing, so you have my full respect!
     
  5. RHP
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    RHP Senior Member

    Many of the many 1960's and 70's yachts might fit the bill. Look back in history to find the future.
     
  6. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Philosophy

    =========
    Thats cool!
     

  7. scotdomergue
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    scotdomergue Scot

    I've looked at many production yachts of the 60's and 70's - made from fiberglass and generally heavier and wider than Sopranino and Barchetta. I owned a Venture 17 which was light (800 lbs if I remember correctly), and I used oars for auxiliary power, though she was wide and high for that to work well - and there is no way that her swing keel and general seaworthiness would have been adequate for crossing oceans in reasonable safety.

    Can you identify a few specific designs that are under 1000 lbs, less than 6 foot beam, and truly seaworthy - to the degree of Sopranino and Barchetta (and Trekka was even better, I think, though heavy), designed for and perhaps actually made using modern materials and methods, and with at least the potential to set up for effective sliding-seat rowing?
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2016
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