Type of wood and suppliers of timber for supports in Australia?

Discussion in 'Materials' started by tontoOx, Feb 25, 2021.

  1. tontoOx
    Joined: Feb 2021
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    Location: Australia

    tontoOx Junior Member

    Actually, now that I think about it, that aspect was in relation to using solid wood for the bottom versus marine ply with a fibreglass bottom internal and external. There were posts that discussed this which essentially concluded that a lapstrake construction or double planking provided a more repairable solution. I didn't like that option as it would add weight to the boat, marine ply wins in terms of weight as far as I am concerned, and won't leak. I'm sorry I don't have the link to that discussion anymore.

    If a boat with marine ply hits a rock that's not good for many reasons, especially the marine ply...

    But I guess my point is that, as in the old days, when epoxy wasn't around, marine enamel did the job for "coating", it just meant an annual maintenance recoat was sometimes needed.
     
  2. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Barbados

    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    That Eastport nesting pram is gorgeous - but as you say she will be a lot of work.
    I see that her beam is 4' - I built myself a little 2 part nesting dinghy 20 odd years ago - it is basically a scaled down version of Danny Greene's Chameleon.
    Mine is 7'6" long, and the maximum beam is 3'5" including the rubbing strakes on the gunwhales; the bow nests inside the stern for 4' of overall length.
    She is very easy to build, with just a single chine, and she rows beautifully - I have overtaken rubber dinghies with 2 hp motors with ease when we were both going upwind.
    She can take 2, so long as the passenger is not too heavy - I once had three people (about 380 lbs in total) in her, and I could row her, but we did not have an awful lot of freeboard left!
    I will attach a photo of her below.
    I was going to send you a private message, but I think that you are 'too new' on here - I guess you have to post a few times first before you can receive PMs.
    If you (or anybody else) would like a copy of my hand drawn plans (including full dimensions for the panel shapes), if you let me have an email address I will email them to you.

    Here are a few links re Chameleon which inspired my Little Chameleon.

    Chameleon https://duckworksmagazine.com/04/s/designs/greene/cham/

    https://www.goodoldboat.com/promo_pdfs/March12_Promo.pdf

    Building Robbie https://www.sailorgirl.com/adventures/building-robbie/
     

    Attached Files:

  3. tontoOx
    Joined: Feb 2021
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    Location: Australia

    tontoOx Junior Member

    EDIT/Correction - When I said lapstrake or double diagonal planking that was in the context of using solid wood. Cold moulding with veneers is presumably the same as plywood in terms of delamination risk from moisture/water.

    The following YouTube video shows a guy using PVC for chines and supports in an 18 foot plywood boat. I'm not sure of the merits of that from a strength point of view but presumably the epoxy glue/filets is what provides the strength there. In one of the episodes of this series he also shows how to cover embedded screws properly with epoxy. If you see the whole series you will also see him sanding down after epoxy has cured (wholly or partially I don't know) with an orbital sander but wearing no mask. However, his orbital sander is connected to vacuum cleaner so maybe that reduces the hazard somewhat? Oh and he is pretty good on the drums too, if you see the videos you will know what I mean:

     
  4. tontoOx
    Joined: Feb 2021
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    Location: Australia

    tontoOx Junior Member

    Thanks for the info/links and looks good. Happy for you to PM me with the plan for your version if that is possible.
     
  5. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Barbados

    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    I have sent you a PM - this was not possible earlier, so it looks like you are fully 'approved' now! :)
     
  6. tontoOx
    Joined: Feb 2021
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    Location: Australia

    tontoOx Junior Member

    Thanks, got the PM but I don't think I want to build a mini Chameleon. I like the clever rear side flotation which still permits netsting but I don't like the longitudinal/central seating arrangement or the high mid bulkheads where the two halves join. Also, my pram will be closer to 8 foot long and 3 foot wide. I will make the two seats of the Ken Simpson simple 8 foot pram into permanent bouyancy. I can always add the Fly Fisher's side sponsons as an optional extra at a later stage if I want to which adds another operational dynamic.
     

  7. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Barbados

    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Apologies, I hadn't looked at the two Duckworks links you posted earlier, only the mention of the Eastport pram. which made me think of my 2 part nesting pram.
    The Duckworks prams are effectively punts, or a bit like jon boats in a way.
    Positive buoyancy is always a good idea, wherever you can manage to fit it in.
    Re the Fly Fisher's side sponsons, it is also possible to buy inflatable tubes that strap on to the side of the boat to effectively make it rather like a RHIB.
    What sort of distance do you envisage rowing your pram on a typical outing?
    Or would you have a small electric motor?
    I guess that your main use will be for fishing?
     
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