Truck diesels

Discussion in 'DIY Marinizing' started by parkland, Nov 7, 2012.

  1. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    >A correctly sized keel cooler is optimized for summer and relies upon the thermostat to limit flow in winter to keep the engine in the correct temp range.<


    A by-passs thermostat is the simple cure for keel cooler operation.

    The one built in the truck engine lets the water out to the cooling system , the by pass has the return water at the proper temp.

    AS both operate in fresh water with antifreez to reduce corrosion they are long lived items.


    >Something to bear in mind though, this is only diesel engines from trucks or tractors, not gas engines. Marine gas engines have a lot more differences than diesels.<

    Folks with gas engines frequently are simply replacing a worn out engine.

    The carb flame catcher , the marine alternator and starter are the main items to remove from the old engine .

    The local dealer for the car brand sells >crate engines< that are not too costly and the ones built to work truck specs (forged crank, salt cooled valves) will last longest.
     
  2. Navygate

    Navygate Previous Member

    Interesting keel cooling should come up.
    I was going to mention the benefits of it in my earlier posts but thought I had proposed enough food for thought already.
     
  3. parkland
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    parkland Senior Member


    A fan would keel the engine space cooler, there would be considerable heat from the dry exhaust system.
    I didn't mean radiator fan, but rather an engine room ventilation fan.
     
  4. FAST FRED
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    A fan would keel the engine space cooler, there would be considerable heat from the dry exhaust system.
    I didn't mean radiator fan, but rather an engine room ventilation fan.

    It is unwise to pressurize an engine space as the smell heat and an exhaust leak would be powered into the living spaces.

    A big alt and a couple of discard auto radiator fans can Suck the heat and smell outside.
     
  5. parkland
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    parkland Senior Member

    I was actually picturing kind of a small belt driven centrifugal fan, with maybe a 6 inch outlet routed outside, so it sucks air from the engine compartment, and blows it outside.

    Curiously, I wonder about using the exhaust itself to draw out air? Picture a 6 inch pipe traveling vertical out of the engine comartment up and outside, then a 2" exhaust pipe inside, cut about 8 " short of the larger pipe.... as the exhaust blows out, wouldn't it draw the air up and out of the 6 inch pipe with it?
     
  6. parkland
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    parkland Senior Member

    Something like this :

    [​IMG]

    Kind of complex, but it would be nice to avoid extra moving parts.
     
  7. parkland
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    parkland Senior Member

  8. sdowney717
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    sdowney717 Senior Member

    Regarding heat, what do you do with turbochargers? When I see dry exhaust wraps-blankets, it looks like the turbos are not insulated. That must be adding a lot of heat into the engine space.

    I do like this idea of in International 466 powered boat.
    Somewhere I read the engine height is 40 inches. To fit in my boat, I would have to remove the drip pan and cut part of a floor beam deeper than it is already. I would then add a sister on either side. Looking at the oil pan, the deep sump is limited in length, so hull mods would not be difficult I think.

    And can you heat wrap the 466 exhaust manifold? Pictures look like you can.

    How effective is such wrapping tape?

    And how about the trans gears, anyone have bellhousing part number adapter and flex plate to a marine gear?
     
  9. FAST FRED
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    And how about the trans gears, anyone have bellhousing part number adapter and flex plate to a marine gear?"

    The Intl 360 and 466 have SAE bellhousings so the gut at the tranny shop can make it all an easy bolt in.

    Uears ago sports cars would tilt the engine , to fit it under the hood.

    A simple modification to the lube oil pickup might allow fitting a tall engine.

    They did it in my MB 300SL Roadster in the 50's.
     
  10. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    Be careful when tilting engines to the side. Too much tilt may cause problems with oil draining from from the head back to the sump. Side tilt is designed into engines.
     
  11. sdowney717
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    sdowney717 Senior Member

    http://www.foleyengines.com/resources/tech-tips/sae-bell-housings-made-easy
    SAE bell housing chart

    I am not familiar with how this works. Is there an adapter that bolts onto the trans on one side, then the engine on the other, and is this adapter designed by SAE #?
    So a SAE#2 bellhousing would use an SAE#2 bellhousing to trans adapter plate?
    Is this a flat plate?
    How about the coupler between trans and engine, some kind of flex plate that bolts to engine flywheel? Would the IH 466 flywheel accommodate a standard flex plate coupler for a given transmission?

    It does sound easy, if the parts simply bolt one to another, anyone have picture links or online catalogs of these type parts?
     

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  12. sdowney717
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    sdowney717 Senior Member

    It would be interesting to be able to use my existing 72C 2.57 to 1 velvet drives.
    You would need an SAE #2 adapter, which I have yet to find.
    I did find an SAE #3 adapter for $1100 to fit my existing transmissions.
    http://www.sbmar.com/product/borg-warner-velvet-drive-to-cummins-5-9-hd-adapter-kit/
    Which is not a #2.

    It may be you just DIY, make your own from steel plates, or go to a metal fabrication shop, which likely is cheaper than $1100 a piece.

    I would not pay that price.

    To fab it up, disassemble velvet drive. keep input shaft with front housing.
    Cut plate to fit to trans face, may have to be creative on the velvet drive as it is not totally flat, sort of. It is a large circle with little inner lobe ears for the bolts. 3/8 inch plate I think would work, but perhaps needs nuts welded onto plate backside and thread plate and nuts together.
    I sort of think thicker plate would be better but harder to work. Maybe use 3/8 plate be sufficient.
    Get the right damper connector to motor.
    Carefully line it up with motor .
    Drill outer holes in plate to match bolt holes in sae #2 bell housing and cut off excess outer edge of plate.

    here is a used sae 2 plate for a different trans
    http://www.surplusman.com/Detail.php?itemid=3452
     
  13. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    Critical for any adapter plate is very accurate location of the bolt holes for the engine with the bolt holes for the transmission/drive. This determines the alignment of the transmission/drive input shaft to the engine crankshaft/flywheel. If the alignment is off severe damage to the transmission/drive can result.
     
  14. sdowney717
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    sdowney717 Senior Member

    Sure would be careful.
    Ok a way to line this up. Setup the trans face on your plate bolted down. Place it against bell housing with the flex plate in place.
    Lift it up, make a mark, let it go down, mark it, now you have the mid point center. Do similar side to side.

    Also the velvet drive fits into a ring, the bolts do not align the trans, the ring aligns the trans.
    And perhaps on the adapter to bellhousing- 2 alignment centering pins as exist on a car to transmission. I don't know if they do that OEM for boats, but would make sense.
    And the velvet drive, the bolts hole circle is bigger than the inner support ring circle, so a flat plate with a hole and the bolt holes drilled is how it would be.
    It might need to 1/2 inch steel, since the prop is pushing against that.

    Another way might be to create a template of circles in circles and having the exact center point, then draw a circle for the trans. I assume the outer bolt circle on the bellhousing is an exact circle.
    So you would first create an adapter perfected to the engine bell housing, pins to center the plate not bolts. The using the exact center point, you can accurately draw the circle to cut for the trans.

    Assuming the center point is the center of the engine crank, which I don't know if it is, but I think it should be so. anyone know?
     

  15. GeoffinSouthOz
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    GeoffinSouthOz Junior Member

    Interesting thread. My experience with diesels is limited and in marine diesels to two low hp Yanmars. Whilst the thread is about big truck engines it occurs to me that smaller boats could benefit from smaller engines found in cars. Around here it's common to see marinised car engines (petrol) in 15-25 foot boats so see no reason you couldn't marinise a small diesel for a 30 - 50 foot yacht. Anyone seen this done and if so with what kind of success?

    Geoff in South Australia
     
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