Truck diesels

Discussion in 'DIY Marinizing' started by parkland, Nov 7, 2012.

  1. Sailor of Fortu
    Joined: May 2013
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    Location: Jacksonville, Fl

    Sailor of Fortu New Member

    How difficult is it to marinize one of these engines to Heat exchanger and water cooled exhaust? Do any of the companies make off the shelf WC manifolds? Mase or other companies?
     
  2. slow fred
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    Location: florida

    slow fred Junior Member

    I was talking, preventive maintenance, I never run my engine to " total failure limit". That will cost you down time and a lot more expence.
     
  3. woodboatwayne
    Joined: May 2013
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    Location: rockport texas

    woodboatwayne Junior Member

    Most marinization parts are generic. Water cooled exhaust manifolds are engine specific.
    Exhaust risers with water injection can be fabricated or canabilized from other marine engines. The easiest marinization is "keel cooling". the keel cooler can be fabricated from 1" copper. The length can be calculated, but I prefer to measure one on a comparable horse power boat that is known to work. Always use a zink on the cooler.
    NEVER use stainless tubing as it doesn't conduct heat well. If you can use a "dry stack"
    almost no mods are needed. A different thermostat might be needed to maintain proper temp.
     
  4. Sailor of Fortu
    Joined: May 2013
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    Location: Jacksonville, Fl

    Sailor of Fortu New Member

    I realize that it is easier and cheaper to keel cool/ drystack. That is NOT what I asked. I'm still trying to get an idea of the cost to add heat exchanger and wet exhaust set up.
    It is my understanding that Palmers were intl engines, although probably not the current models.
     
  5. woodboatwayne
    Joined: May 2013
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    Location: rockport texas

    woodboatwayne Junior Member

    The heat exchanger is the easiest/least expensive part of the conversion. The shell and tube heat exchangers are mostly generic and most gas V8 engines would use the same
    size you need. Same with belt drive raw water pumps. I hope your onto something with
    the palmer exhaust manifold
     
  6. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    Marine Exhaust Systems of Alabama, Inc.
    www.mesamarine.com/‎

    These guys may be able to help with a wet exhaust manifold.

    With a standard dry exhaust manifold a simple pipe riser and then water injector (OTS) will work fine , but insulating the exhaust manifold is a good idea.

    Also a good long term idea if you insist on a wet manifolds is to install it as part of the engine cooling and use a bit bigger heat exchanger .

    And hook up the exhaust to dump the cooling water as in a dry manifold.

    This will save the pri$y wet exhaust manifold from constant replacement.
     
  7. parkland
    Joined: Jul 2012
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    Location: canada

    parkland Senior Member


    Swain coatings can coat exhuast manifold with ceramic coatings that are supposed to work real good.
     
  8. jeffb957
    Joined: Dec 2013
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    Location: Huntsville, Alabama

    jeffb957 Junior Member

    Last I heard, and I haven't really looked into it since the mid 90's, Ford was outsourcing their diesel engine manufacturing to International, and the Ford Powerstroke 7.3 was just a DT466 rebadged with a different paint job. If so, parts for the 7.3 Powerstroke will most likely bolt right up to the DT466
     
  9. slow fred
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    Location: florida

    slow fred Junior Member

    7.3 is a V-8, 466 is a in-line 6.
     
  10. jeffb957
    Joined: Dec 2013
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    Location: Huntsville, Alabama

    jeffb957 Junior Member

    Hmm, 15 years ago I worked for a feed mill and drove an International S1900 truck with a bulk feed body on it. The badge on the side the hood said DT466, and the engine inside was the same V8 Diesel that was in the Ford pickups. Maybe it was a swap. the truck was old
     
  11. slow fred
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    Location: florida

    slow fred Junior Member

    7.3 and the 444 are the same V-8 IH engines. Most 444 in bigger trucks didn't have turbos.
     
  12. mike73
    Joined: Feb 2014
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    Location: Åland

    mike73 New Member

    I have also looked ar the 466 engine but cant find any dimensions on it, it looks like quit a high engine is there any one that has any info regarding dimensions for this engines?
     
  13. Navygate

    Navygate Previous Member

    If I had it to do over, I'd get an appropriate turbo diesel and very the boost according to need.
    Optimize the design around naturally aspirated with the luxury of more HP only when needed.
    Power on demand without the added expense and weight of a big diesel that would be at risk of running under loaded most of the time.
    I believe this approach to be hugely practical and completely under utilized.
     
  14. jonr
    Joined: Sep 2008
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    Location: Great Lakes

    jonr Senior Member

    What is the advantage of varying the boost vs leaving the boost constant?
     

  15. aktmboyd
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: Kimmirut, Nunavut

    aktmboyd Senior Member

    A turbo will vary boost constantly. There is no way to control a turbo's boost level other than throttle input or change the loading of the motor. Each wave the hull encounters will put more load on the hull, therefore more load on the motor and then there is more boost at the same rpm setting or even a lower rpm. Now plough through the wave there is less load on the hull the turbo will sense the lessened drive line pressure and spin slower lowering the boost level. You can control the PSI that a turbo will make by it's waste gate, as long as it is in the range of pressure the turbo is capable of making. But it will still change it's pressure independently. The only way to get a predetermined boost level is by a super charger and that is governed by Rpm of the motor, slower rpm less boost, more rpm more boost.
     
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