Trophy 2152 WA (Boat Construction?)

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by Catboy, Dec 12, 2020.

  1. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    3600 is the nada guidance; so he'd be close

    I don't know if foam would have been required in this size vessel in 2011, but it may already be in the bilge
     
  2. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I'd say it will have foam, just need to cut some inspection ports.
     
  3. Catboy
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    Catboy Junior Member

    "While not a high priced boat, they were built fairly well by that point."
    Agreed!

    "Gel Coat Products and Spectrum Colors can supply you with the correct gel coat for your year and model."
    Thank you!

    The stringers do contain wood.
    Oh....... Do you know if they are douglas fir, "marine plywood," some type of foam, or?

    "Numerous limber holes aren't common in production boats. It takes extra time and they tend to introduce water to the wood. Water reaching the wood can be prevented, but it takes time and skill."
    Agreed, and it shouldn't be a problem, if on this boat, it is regularly inspected and maintained.
     
  4. Catboy
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    Catboy Junior Member

    It has very little foam, a little sprayed around the fish well boxes and gas tanks. I'd guess just enough to provide support and prevent things from dislodging and bouncing around.
    I don't think it comes anywhere near 60 cubic feet. Are you buoyancy advocates at all familiar with this model - Trophy 2152 WA? I agree, it would be swell if I could make this boat to be self buoyant! Again, I'm not knocking this vessel, I'm trying to make it better, safer and look for potential problems ahead. I like this boat, it suits my needs and I want to make sure it is safe and doesn't degrade. If there is built in buoyancy that I'm not aware of I'd LOVE to hear about it. And thanks for the contributions!
     
  5. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I don't know what the regulations say, it might have fallen outside them by being a fraction over the length they need foam. I would not let that deter me, and as indicated by someone earlier, you may not need the 60 cubic feet, as the specific gravity of the hull plays a part
     
  6. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    All plywood decks are not needed to be offset in foam, for one example.
     
  7. ondarvr
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    The specific gravity of the laminate will be in the 1.7 range, engine 7.8, some quick calculations will get you close.

    I didn't look at the CG method, it may be a bit different, they mention fuel tanks and people.
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2020
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  8. mudsailor
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    mudsailor Junior Member

    So, hull laminate will be 3 layers of 24oz WR with 30mils of chop between and a 90 mile chop/vinylester resin skin coat. Hull side was 2415 knit (IIRC it was 90mils skin, 90 miles chop and then the 2415 (2 layers IIRC). Regular resin was a DCPD modified polyester
    Now, from about 2005 all the trophy’s had NO structural wood, they had molded fiberglass stringers and transverses, although they were molded the ‘other’ way around (gel coat on the inside) and then overlaid with glass (ie not glued into the hull). They were then foam filled, enough foam to meet NMMA ‘basic flotation’ requirements (OB powered boat under 26’ long)
    Feel free to message me with any questions......
    If there was any wood used in the boat, it would have been the XL treated plywood.....which was true for any Trophy or Bayliner/Maxum runabout from about 2001......as was stated earlier.....a Bayliner from the 2000’s was nothing like the older boats....
     
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  9. ondarvr
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    I didn't see the switch to hollow stringers on Trophys, although that was the direction all models were headed. And the introduction of hollow stringers was done when new tooling was built for each length of a particular model, so having hollow stringers in one length Trophy may not mean all of them did.

    Hollow is the best option possible.
     
  10. mudsailor
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    mudsailor Junior Member

    Some models were changed to molded stringers as part of a upgrade, not a new model......it took a number of years to get all the models upgraded
    They are not hollow, foam filled (after installation)
    How do I know, I was there.....approved the designs, saw the tooling, saw the boats being built in Cumberland, before they moved to TN
     
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  11. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Forgive me for being a nit, but I gotta ask.

    2-2" wide stringer say 10" high is 20" sq times 24' at 12"/ is roughly 8 cubic feet at roughly 58# is only about 500 pounds

    Is it fair to say it is insufficient in total, or is it enough to offset the rest or to get below 1.
     
  12. ondarvr
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    New model as in new tooling, frequently this included small upgrades that weren't so much a total make over, just incremental improvements.

    There's frequently not an exact date of release, there could be 6 molds for the same part, they might not bring six new molds in at once with the new design. Two versions could be being made side by side until all the tooling was updated. Stringer grids are a bit different because they are quick and simple to make. You could probably make enough off one mold to keep up with production.

    These changes would take place at different times for different length boats, even within the same model line.

    Bayliner made so many changes and improvements during the 2000s that it was hard to keep up with all of them.

    At the same time there was also a big merge of hull design being the same across several brands and models of boats that were owned and made under one tent.

    Instead of a particular brand/model having a unique hull design, they changed to having almost all hulls of each length the same, and only the deck layout and other details were different to keep the look of the original brand. Just like Chevrolet-GM-Buick, Johnson-Evinrude, Mercury-Mariner, and now Tohatsu making small motors for everybody.

    I'm not sure if that happened with these after the move.

    When three or four brands are being made under one roof it's difficult to build and store different tooling for each brand and model, so they trim it down as much as possible.
     
  13. ondarvr
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    Frequently the stringer grid was incorporated with the hull liner mold, this allowed for much more space for foam than a traditional wood stringer dimension.

    The only problem with these is if the foam gets wet, there's no easy way to remove it. Not that foam is easy to remove in most situations any how.
     
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  14. Catboy
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    Catboy Junior Member

    Mudsailor, thank you so much for the reply and specs!
    I'm not clear on this part - "although they were molded the ‘other’ way around (gel coat on the inside) [I get this] and then overlaid with glass [i get this] (ie not glued into the hull) [i don't get this]."

    I'm thinking that last bit isn't what you meant or I don't understand what you meant. Surely the stringer/transverse grid is bonded to the hull and it appears to be everywhere, so please clarify if you can. I'm imagining the stringer / grid parts were made on a male mold "(gel coat on the inside)", the stringer / grid parts were popped, set in the hull and bonded to the hull "then overlaid with glass" to the hull and then the stringer/transverse grid was injected with foam. Is that it? Any idea what type foam? I see what appears to be 2 part foam blown around the fishwells to support them to the other areas below.

    My 2011 2152WA Hardtop definitely has some high quality treated plywood in it and I suppose it's the Greenwood XL. I can look into the inspection port behind the steering area and see plywood projecting from the bottom of the main deck liner. The plywood all looks good. Much of the transom area is made up of what appears to be 2" thick plywood (at least down low). They may have used thinner material up higher.

    The more I go through this boat the more I realize it was really well made!

    Can you tell me if the hull deck seam is definitely glued or just sealed? From inside I can't really tell if it's either. I'm not interested enough to pull the rubrail partly off to see because I don't see any water leaking anywhere along the rubrail. I can tell you they used screws about every 6".

    Since the boat is nearly 10 years old I decided to pull the trim tabs, sounders, and drain plug. That's 22 screw holes spread across the entire bottom transom, port to starboard, under the water line. I had 1 hole that produced 2 tablespoons of water and another (right at the drain plug) that produced 2 oz. Probably small voids that water got into. The plywood looks just fine in those places and you can see 2" think plywood where the drain plug is and where water obviously pools, again, all the plywood looks just fine. The outer layer of fiberglass is super beefy as you well know. All super solid. I put a vacuum bag / pump on the wet screw holes and am ready to start reassembly.

    I'm interested in this flotation dialog as it would be fantastic to come to the conclusion this boat would float or I could make it float if completely swamped. Again thanks for the input!
     

  15. Catboy
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    Catboy Junior Member

    But if the stringer / grids were blown with closed cell foam after they were installed I wouldn't think wet foam would be a problem but only in a few isolated voids, whereas the hollow areas could trap water that could only be removed by drilling holes? The earlier foams would absorb water. Later foams would not if I'm not mistaken.
     
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