Trophy 2152 WA (Boat Construction?)

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by Catboy, Dec 12, 2020.

  1. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    There is a really big salvage yard in Lanier Georgia. See if they have a junk boat. Your best bet on parts is a scrapyard if you strikeout on original replacements.
     
  2. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Also, if you have one good piece of the trim; you could use it as a plug and make a mould and build the part in fiberglass. Not as easy as a credit card, but if you got no other way...
     
  3. ondarvr
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    Call a shop that builds custom bimini tops and enclosures.
     
  4. Catboy
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    Catboy Junior Member

    Good suggestions fallguy & on ondarv, thanks.
     
  5. Catboy
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    Catboy Junior Member

    Ondarv,

    Do you know if these boats used woven roving in their layup? I haven't seen any but maybe it's covered up with chopper gun & matt fiber. Any thoughts?
     
  6. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Don't know where that idea comes from, but that boat certainly could and should have some buoyancy material, as fallguy says, it is the best kind of insurance against a hull failure, but it needs to be approached properly, with the right material, enough of it, and placed correctly. It will cost some $, but it is the last thing to skimp on. My view is you install such protection, but if it becomes impractical in larger vessels, you want a self-inflating liferaft, that will cost a bomb, and take up too much weight and space on a trailer boat. I will never forget the look on the face of a bloke who was rescued from a 20 foot centre console well offshore, as the thing sank within minutes of his being rescued, he was just lucky there were a couple of boats fishing that reef, that day.
     
  7. ondarvr
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    You've been asking questions about construction methods that are outdated.

    First it was about glass covered wood stringers, and now about roving.

    Not covering wooden stringers with glass was discontinued decades ago, and was only done on low end boats.

    Using roving and/or stitched fabrics is something that has been the rule even longer. You'd have to go back a long ways to find an all chop boat.

    Yes there will be some low life builder or repair shop that will do it, but major manufacturers discontinued it 40+ years ago.

    Bayliner (Trophy) improved their construction methods considerably long before your boat was built.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2020
  8. Catboy
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    Catboy Junior Member

    You seem defensive about my inquiries. As I said in my first post the boat seems solid (excepting the fish well doors). I'm just trying to figure out where there is wood and where there is not wood. I'd also like to know where they used foam in the construction.

    That's great, the stringers don't contain wood. What are they?

    The stringers could be molded parts (hollow?) covered with fiberglass bonding them to the hull but usually a molded part isn't covered up and over the whole molded part and down onto the hull with mat fiberglass on top. Usually a molded part would be smooth and then glued, taped and bonded to the hull like I've seen in a hundred boats. I'm not complaining about how it was done I'm just trying to understand how and why it was done. Woven roving under that mat would be a great thing. I'm also wondering why there are no limber holes connecting the compartments under the V-berth in the cuddy cabin. It doesn't seem like a big problem but usually a path for water would be provided from my experience.

    I know they used plywood in the main, aft deck and in some of the bulkheads because I can see it in the hole cutouts for wiring in the bulkheads and in the plywood deck where the plywood extends beyond the molded fiberglass deck on the inside. I'm hoping they didn't use foam because I doubt they used vacuum bagging and what I saw in the de-laminated fish well doors (plywood and foam) frankly, scared me to look for problems and ask questions. Thus far none that I can find.
     
  9. Catboy
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    Catboy Junior Member

    That idea came from - I read it somewhere. The Trophy 2152 weighs 3600 lbs. not including people, gas and gear. Off the top of my head it would take 60 cubic feet of foam (certainly more) to float just 3600 lb.s. That's a lot of volume to put in this boat. Most of the boat is stuffed or inaccessible except the cuddy cabin. Perhaps emergency airbags for offshore work would be doable. I don't know.
     
  10. ondarvr
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    You only need to determine the weight while submerged.

    So the flotation foam doesn't need to float the entire weight of the boat.
     
  11. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    ondarvr is one of the most down to earth; matter of fact contributors on the board

    you are lucky to have him responding to your enquiries

    I think you need to do some poking around to see of there is any foam.
     
  12. ondarvr
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    I didn't mean to come across that way, the questions would be legitimate for a pre 1985 boat, not yours.

    While not a high priced boat, they were built fairly well by that point.

    Gel Coat Products and Spectrum Colors can supply you with the correct gel coat for your year and model.

    The stringers do contain wood.

    Numerous limber holes aren't common in production boats. It takes extra time and they tend to introduce water to the wood. Water reaching the wood can be prevented, but it takes time and skill.
     
  13. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    3600 lbs sounds a lot for this boat, but that can be established on a weighbridge, boat+trailer compared to trailer only. You need to do a thorough audit to be properly establishing the buoyancy spaces available, or if already provided for.
     
  14. ondarvr
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    The Coast Guard has a formula to calculate flotation requirements on their website for boat building.
     

  15. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    That sounds helpful, I think the US regs are far ahead of Australia, where there is little emphasis on stopping trailer boats sinking, it really isn't that difficult or costly.
     
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