Trimaran with accomodation in the amas

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by eiasu, Nov 23, 2012.

  1. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    Our performance wouldn't be "very good" by sport boat standards. We can hit close to Farrier speeds but it takes twice as much wind by the numbers. Like 30 knots instead of 15. This is because our rig is much smaller in comparison to a Farrier but Nicols and traditional cruising tris have much better capsize records. Hot rodding the rig would lose the cruising advantages we now have. So cruising performance encompasses more things than outright speed. Cruising tris such as these also have more room and payload than the current or older hotrods. Most of them can surf past 20 knots on ocean waves, Boats like ours have done that in flat water racing but you need a alert crew and lots of wind..Most cruising is done below 10 knots.
    Cruising cats these days are going to fatter than 8/1 hulls and have to drag 2 of them around. A cruising tri will only be dragging one plump hull and can still have good load carrying if the amas help with the load. So as usual comparisons need to be based on more than one criteria to understand what is going on and which features suit your needs the best. (come on Richard if you have no plans for larger trimarans clearly you need to draw some....)
     
  2. oceancruiser

    oceancruiser Previous Member

    jamez >>>.

    Have any 71 ft Tris by that design ever been built and are sailing to your knowledge.

    I would be interested in it's sailing performance data.

    Note it was designed some time ago so it would be reasonable to assume the float design would probably differ now with the increased knowledge gained since and with a protected hard cover cockpit with dual steering positions.
     
  3. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

    It was updated by Kurt to a 75' length for Mark in Belgium and you can see some renders on the blog update over at the following link. I assume they would put a soft cover over the cockpit when needed. I've not heard of a 71' being built but some of the 63' design has been.

    http://multihullblog.com/2012/01/new-75-trimaran-design/

    Some 63' examples here:

    Atlantis (looks like she would eat the miles effortlessly) http://www.multihullcompany.com/Trim.../SS63/Atlantis

    Rosinante
    http://www.multihullcompany.com/Trim...erry/Rosinante
     
  4. Steve W
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    Steve W Senior Member

    Dosnt look like there would be any accomodations in the amas of the Kurt Hughes tri.
     
  5. oceancruiser

    oceancruiser Previous Member

    hyperlinks not working Corley.

    Interesting Drawings. You don't happen to have been dated with access to study plans.

    Note no dagger boards in the hulls and it appears there is head room in the amass. Engine compartment in the bow? with bow thrusters ? and reversed bow hull shape compared to the 71 footer. Radical yes. Will it sail ocean going conditions? Tank tested I presume - don't happen to know do you. If built it certainly would be a head turner and magzine sort after features.
     
  6. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

  7. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    The builder showed me through Rozinante after launching. I see from the site it sold and some things were done that needed to be. Really beautiful job on the hull but not room for the original posters amount of guests. Boats this wide shouldn't contemplate ama accommodations, with more weight you need less beam. For ex racers like the really big record breakers bringing the cabin out from the main hull will be about the only option. How many bunks for Bank Poplaire?
     
  8. oceancruiser

    oceancruiser Previous Member


    You don't happen to have Kurts study plan book hyperlink URL do you.

    The larger Tris don't seem to be in keeping with his other designs.

    Thanks.


    Can't find your link to his web page on his web page either.


    //
     
  9. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

    You have to buy his study plan book as far as I know although the 63' trimaran is listed under the new designs segment of his web site and the 71' trimaran under the multihull studio section.
     
  10. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

    On Banque Pop V they hot bunked so about seven bunks? There were also two bunks aft for the skipper and navigator. When you look at Banque Pop's hulls you understand why they are nearly knife fine except round the transom. I think even previous generation boats like Geronimo were only about a metre wide at their widest point at the waterline on the main hull.
     
  11. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    Interesting to present them as a performance charter option. "The ride of your life as you crew to Martinique". They would have to add wing extensions for a bit more room but wouldn't have to carry round the world provisions.
     
  12. tspeer
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    tspeer Senior Member

    I think you'll find that below roughly 35 ft, the trimaran has more space than a catamaran. For approximately 40 ft and above, the catamaran definitely has more space than a trimaran. For example, compare an Atlantic 57(or Atlantic 48) catamaran with a Hammerhead 54 trimaran, both designed by the same person and both about the same length. The cats have more berths and a saloon of double the size.

    If you're considering 78 ft and want large accommodations, the cat is a better bet. If you want the accommodations of a 50 ft cat with the performance of a 78 ft boat, then one might consider the tri.

    From what you've described, a Gunboat 78 would be a good baseline for comparison.
     
  13. Steve W
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    Steve W Senior Member

    Im not sure that the Tri has more space at any size really, about the roomiest tri under 30ft for example would probably be a Tristar 27 and its pretty roomy but there are many cats in that size range with more useable space. I have an old Gemini 3000 which has 3 staterooms which you can walk in and close the door and get dressed, the fwd berth is 63"x78" and not tapered,thets bigger than a houshold queen, the 2 aft ones are 44" at the fwd end tapering to about 40" at the foot and you can sit up in them. The galley is 8ft long with lots of storage,the nav station is 8ft long with lots of storage,the head is large and has a shower. The cat just has a better configuration for space. I think the Tri rules from 20ft to maybe 28ft. The Horstman would sail a lot better than the Gemini though i suspect. Once you get to 78ft either one is going to be huge.

    Sreve.
     
  14. eiasu
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    eiasu Junior Member

    The luxury of Gunboat is not my cup of tea, but i really love Chris White designs,
    from what I read Hammerhead is superior in performance and comfort (reduced and softer motion)
    and the Atlantic Cat has bigger accommodation.
    The Ideal combination would be to have performance and motion of the hammerhead with the space of the Atlantic 77 :D:idea:
     

  15. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    Sounds like a really long Hammerhead. Here is a Nicol Voyager built by Derek Kelsall's yard way back. Good for 8-10 knots with guests and gear. Since it can sleep about 12 people that isn't bad. This one is stretched to 48' instead of 45' with a bit longer deckhouse and taller ketch rig. The harbor shot shows how big these things start to get at the dock.
     

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