Trimaran with accomodation in the amas

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by eiasu, Nov 23, 2012.

  1. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    I think Rick and I would be a fine team, if he gets seasick I want to be in another hull though.
     
  2. SpiritWolf15x
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    SpiritWolf15x Senior Member

    You could probably sleep 2 in each of the amas of my Buccaneer 33, if it were needed.
     
  3. eiasu
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    eiasu Junior Member

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Apr 12, 2013
  4. Schoolbus
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    Schoolbus Junior Member

    Found this thread which discusses Trimaran with accomodations in the Amas:

    I found these 2 tris- modern ones-
    1. Neel 51 Trimaran


    2. 52 Foot custom tri, called Sesame.
    Looks like it would be fast. Dunno if it is designed to fly a hull or not. Designed/built by Alain Guilbaud.


    Both nice- don't know which one would sail faster, what do you think?

    Al
     
  5. David Hutchings
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    David Hutchings Junior Member

    Hi There. My wife and I were the second owners of this Voyager. We bought it from the guy that built it in Bristol, UK. It would be great to lean more about what happened to her. Do you have any further information on her? Or the location of those 2 shots. Thanks for your help. David and Joan.
     
  6. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    Those pictures were from when the boat was on the market a while back, close to 10 years ago? It was in Europe, seemed like it was somewhere in the Scandinavian countries or the pictures had been taken there? It looks like a great boat, I talked to sailors in Oz who had sailed on Voyagers used in charter back there and they liked them. There is one in Hawaii too. Tell us more about your time with boat!
     
  7. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Serena- This boat was designed and built by a friend of mine-Gene Walker- over a period of 9 years. He and his family mostly sailed the boat from Southern California to Titusville , Fl. where I met them. The boat has accommodations in each ama , two outside steering stations and one inside. One of the great thrills I've ever had was to sail Serena! She's in the charter business now under a different name.
    Serena2.jpg

    Serena1.jpg

    Serena0.jpg
     
  8. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    I still say your friend modified or was heavily influenced by the Nicol Voyager Doug!
     
  9. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Well, he definitely didn't modify a Nichol. He started the design in about 1960 and wound up in T-ville in the early 70's. I would imagine he was influenced by every tri he had a chance to look at! We met because at the time he arrived I was working on a design for a 60' tri with a configuration just like his- with two outside steering stations and a wheelhouse like his. I ran down to introduce myself and brought him back to the shop-he was as amazed as I was with the similarity.
    That started a great friendship. I think the design is terrific for a cruising tri.
    His main hull was a planing hull(as was mine) but the step aft I wasn't so sure about.We had many a discussion about that. Great times......
    ----
    Cav, I don't remember when you first said that-I found one thread where I posted about this boat a few years ago-might have been another I guess? Do you remember the thread? The link in the thread that I found about Serena being renamed and used as a charter boat is dead-she was in the Caribbean- so she may be too.....
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2018
  10. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    It's been awhile Doug, I'm thinking your friend was a AYRS reader. Nicol (no H) used the planing center hulls and narrow amas too, along with a similar cabin treatment to get the room out to the amas. The real difference is the step stern your friend put on. And the Voyager was designed before 1965/66 as were all Hedley's boats.
     
  11. David Hutchings
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    David Hutchings Junior Member

    She was built in Bristol but a Polish guy who did a superb job. She was called Tripolka. She was made of cold moulded mahogany with WEST resin and sheathed throughout. With this and her box-girder main beams she was immensely strong. He extended it by 3 feet to make the toilets a 'reasonable size'. She was way over her designed weight but she looks much heavier in your pictures as the transom should not be underwater. When we bought her she was quite dilapidated so we spent some time doing her up before packing the whole family on board and sailing away from the UK in 1991. We changed her name to Azania. I extended the main mast by 10 feet to increase the sail area and we bought new standing rigging and sails. The mizzen sail was useless. On out first long trip from Plymouth to La Coruna she averaged 7 knots. We normally averaged 5.5 to 7.5 knots so she was not fast, but was huge inside and a great livaboard. With a single prop and a 45hp engine she was a real handful in marinas. We sold her in southern Spain and she became a dolphin day charter boat, renamed again to Splash II. Her are some pictures from the early 90s.
     

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  12. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    Great Stuff David, the Voyager was the only Nicol with the box girder beams for the anticipated loading. As to the pictures with the transom under the temptation to load something the size of a ship like a ship can be hard to resist, they have to be light to fly. I'll try to sneak in a picture of a Voyager at speed from the old Harris book. I wondered about the tall mast, interesting to hear the story behind it.
     
  13. David Hutchings
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    David Hutchings Junior Member

    The owner builder told me that he built the cross beams and wanted to test them. So he put the beams across 2 supports and craned a farm tractor onto the middle. The 24 foot beams deflected just one millimetre! They were a pain to duck under but there was not a single stress crack in the entire boat. Unlike some of the GRP cats I have owned since.
     
  14. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    Here is the old photo of a Voyager at speed, not a great reproduction but you get the idea. While the boat has a large side profile the business end doesn't have a lot of resistance.
     

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  15. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Cav, was the Voyager 45'?
     
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