Trimaran with accomodation in the amas

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by eiasu, Nov 23, 2012.

  1. Corley
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Corley epoxy coated

    I dont think you can draw too much from the video save that exhibits slamming on a race boat being driven hard and fast in very rough conditions. Cats can slam too given the right conditions particularly when cursed with low bridgedeck clearance.

    ORMA 60's were hardly a regular performance cruising trimaran being very much more at the extreme end of the scale a more useful reference might be this video of a performance Newick cruiser/racer trimaran. I'd still not be inclined to try and have berths in the floats on this boat while on passage.

     
  2. dskira

    dskira Previous Member

    Your Christmas reunion must be quite entertaining.
    Do you get along well? Or do you need a trimaran with a beam of several miles to get the parties separated in each amas ;)
     
  3. eiasu
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    eiasu Junior Member

    I'm figuring out what is possible on a 24 meter multihull,
    the first requirements are about space and comfort,
    performance come after, but still has its place.
    What I mean as performance is a boat that can sail also with light winds,
    rather than high speed peaks.
    I've understood that it's all about compromises,
    comfort, performance and costs.
    So I could say the best performance possible on a multihull 24 meters,
    with 8 simple cabins + 1 big owner cabin + a very big saloon and
    a very large galley.
    If this space it is only supplied by a design like the Horstmann Tristar80 then this will do, I would like to inquiry if it is possible to have such a huge space also on a more performing design. Of course I'm not expecting to have huge space and racing performance, but just a real sailing boat and not a heavy rock that moves only with >10knots of winds ;)

    Thank you very much Richard and everybody for the precious clarifications.
    cheers
    eiasu
     
  4. eiasu
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    eiasu Junior Member

    The Cuan Law design is out of range for lenght,
    but the space are really really impressive!

    The hulls they look really huge!!!

    Accomodation in the ama's the way I mean is not like Cuan law,
    is in a way that the hull are like corridor and the bed are in the wing deck.
    Maybe the central hull can be flared enough that the access to the cabins
    could be from there and the beds still in the wing deck.

    cheers
    eiasu
     

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  5. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

  6. rberrey
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    rberrey Senior Member

    Who is the designer of Cuan Law ?
     
  7. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    A Few Facts about Cuan Law

    Building began in June 1987 in Wheatley, Ontario, a small fishing town on the shores of Lake Eerie. The hull was completed in early November and Cuan was launched and taken on her first voyage across Lake Eerie, through the Welland Barge Canal and across Lake Ontario to Gananoque where Lammer Law was built in 1980. The weekend they moved her was one of the coldest that entire winter and at one point they had five tons of ice on her decks, not to mention the icicles hanging off her wing surfaces. Her interior, rig and commissioning took place in and around Gananoque and a few weeks after her christening she left for the British Virgin Islands via the St. Lawrence Sea Way, Nova Scotia, Bermuda and down. Her passage was not as fast as Lammer Law's in 1980 as she had head winds all the way!

    Designer: Duncan Muirhead
    Owner: Trimarine Boat Co. Ltd.
    Length on deck: 105 feet
    Beam: 44 feet
    Displacement: 75 tons with fuel and water
    Rig: Equal masted stay sail schooner
    Working sail area: 5,200 sq. feet
    Mast height: 103 feet
    Engines: Two 210 hp Caterpillar diesels to drive two feathering propellers. 4 generators.
    Speed under power: 8-10 knots
    Speed under sail: 6-14 knots
    Air fills: Mako compressor with a total of 18.5 cfm output and air bank. Second Mako as standby and for Nitrox.

    Communications
    Your cellphone will work on Roaming almost everywhere in the BVI. If you do not have one with you tell anyone who may need to contact you that they should call us at the office 1 284 494 2490 and we will contact the boat. We also have WiFi on board and the cost to subscibe to this is $25 per week.

    Watermakers
    With two reverse-osmosis watermakers and the capacity to store 1,200 gallons, there is ample fresh water available. The showers function with proper pressure and there is plenty of hot water.

    Generators, Engines & Compressors
    The mechanical operations of the boat happen quietly in the background, serving the guests without intruding on their enjoyment. Cuan Law with her 5,200 sq. ft. of sail, sails a lot with the good trade winds, but when the wind dies she can do the speed of a power boat using her big twin Cats.

    In addition, this impressive vessel has four generators, a complete galley, workshop and an engineer skilled in fixing anything that might go wrong. Backups for backups and quality staff are great comforts on charters and Cuan Law has a good supply of each. In her many years of service Cuan Law has never lost a day through breakdown.

    Owners & Designers, Annie & Duncan Muirhead

    After sailing about two hundred thousand miles in the Seventies and Eighties, Annie and Duncan now spend most of their life ashore in Tortola, BVI, running the company. Duncan still gets the odd urge to go to sea, so once in a while he clambers on board to give the regular skipper a break. You will always see Annie and Duncan on board at the beginning of your trip, meeting and greeting, and then again at the end to hear all about it! They were pioneers in the liveaboard diving field and have been at it since 1970. Both still love the water and Duncan, a Platinum Pro 5000, dives whenever he can. All their experience has allowed them to built ideal, purpose built ships and to run them in a thoroughly professional way.

    They both well understand that their efforts would be useless without superb crew, and over the years they have built up a reputation for attracting the best. All their crew work hard to maintain the high standards they are famous for. You will find all the crew share the work on board in an atmosphere of informality. The current team is introduced on the crew page.
     
  8. eiasu
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    eiasu Junior Member

    3% definetly reasonable,
    please comment this:
    Galapagos tour on Lammer Law
    "Since the boat is relatively small, it tends to rock when anchored. If you are prone to sea-sickness, it is suggested to choose a larger vessel. "
     
  9. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    The website you referenced is an advertisement for a cruise ship company serving the Galapagos Islands. At a mere 93' long, Lammer Law is one of their smaller vessels.

    Alta – 140' schooner
    Anahi – 90’ motor catamaran
    Eclipse – 210’ cruise ship
    Evolution – 192’ cruise ship
    Parranda – 125’ motor yacht
    Yacht Isabela II – 166’ motor yacht
     
  10. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    It would seem the obvious thing to do is to go and charter a berth on Lammer Law for a week.

    Richard Woods
     
  11. cavalier mk2
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Location: Pacific NW North America

    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    I'm really impartial about this if anyone wants to send me a ticket to a prepaid charter. I'll give a impartial review but for fairness you'll also have to send me on a comparable catamaran charter.....

    I thought the 60' tri in the video had pretty gentle transitions considering the conditions, I'm available for those reviews too but all have to booked somewhere it isn't winter.........
     
  12. Alex.A
    Joined: Feb 2010
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    Location: South Africa

    Alex.A Senior Member

    1pm - 6deg c and cloudy in Galapagos..... Maybe somewhere else?
     
  13. eiasu
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    eiasu Junior Member

    I think is not possible at the moment:
    http://www.lammerlaw.com/
     
  14. rberrey
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    rberrey Senior Member

    If you dont trust Cav to go check it out for you I will :). Rick
     

  15. eiasu
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: novutopia, Germany

    eiasu Junior Member

    what's about both?
    :p:D:idea:
     
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