Trimaran Jib Sheet Setup

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Jetboy, May 18, 2015.

  1. Jetboy
    Joined: Feb 2012
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    Jetboy Senior Member

    What's your preference for jib sheeting on a small trimaran. I'm nearing completion of a home built 18' trimaran. I have a full jib sheet setup from a Hobie 18 with cars, tracks, and standup blocks. I also have a full jib sheet setup from a Nacra 5.2 that uses a block that slide fore and aft on a cable along with a barber hauler. I believe it's called a 4-way jib system.

    What would your preference be?
     
  2. rcnesneg
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    rcnesneg Senior Member

    I haven't experimented with the Hobie 18 or Nacra setup, but I've sailed Hobie 16s and Prindle 16s, and I vastly prefer the Hobie 16 setup, where you can slide the traveler in and out on the tracks. In my opinion, once you get the angle set right, it's vastly more important to be able to move the sheets in and out depending on upwind and downwind conditions. Also, it's a HUGE plus to have the jibsheets out of the way and not on the trampoline somewhere.
     
  3. teamvmg
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    teamvmg Senior Member

    If you dont have a multi-hole adjustable clew board, you will need the to be able to track for and aft
     
  4. Jetboy
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    Jetboy Senior Member

    Thanks for the replies.

    I guess the core question is whether it's more important to have the jib sheet angle adjustable laterally, or fore/aft. I had generally assumed that since most multi hulls are so much faster that they generally experience apparent wind angles further forward so they need less range of adjustability in the jib sheets. Possibly I just a haven't been sheeting them very well and given how small a portion of the sail area, it might not be as apparent as a poorly sheeted mast top genoa on a 4ksb.

    Anyway I think I'll likely put the track on the cabin top for the jib and use the Nacra setup down on the tramps to sheet the asym/code0 foresail. Unfortunately I don't have a multi-hole clew board. But I suppose that could be added reasonably easily. I think that might be my best option.
     
  5. rcnesneg
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    rcnesneg Senior Member

    From my experience, once you get the fore-aft setting about right, the adjustment you need is definitely side-to-side. Side to side is more important in my opinion. A Hobie 16 is a perfect example. You might want to rig a way to take it sailing without the track attached until you are sure you have the fore and aft angle right, then affix the track, unless you don't mind relocating the track.
     
  6. Jetboy
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    Jetboy Senior Member

    Unfortunately my modification of the original design is causing some unintended issues - like this one. I'm stuck with a limited track location.

    I just made this drawing in 10 minutes, so forgive the lack of detail. It is to scale as far as the cabin and mast location. I can put the track in either the red or green location. If i use the Nacra system, I'd put it down in the trampoline in the Yellow location. I'm thinking at this point it would work best to add a clew board - they are only $15 - and then use the Nacra system down where the yellow part is for a large front sail for light air. (And the yellow part can be moved as far outboard as I want.
     

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  7. rcnesneg
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    rcnesneg Senior Member

    I would recommend possibly having a way to sheet to the front cross-bar. The configuration you have now will only excel hard on the wind, when you bear off to a beam reach, it would be better to sheet to the crossbar.
     
  8. tspeer
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    tspeer Senior Member

    Put the track fore-aft and inboard to be optimized for trimming upwind. Then use a Cunningham led to the ama to adjust laterally when off the wind.
     
  9. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    This set up works well for us but we use towable cars for the furler. The outboard tackle is often referred to as a barber hauler.
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2015
  10. tspeer
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    tspeer Senior Member

    Oops. Make that a Barber hauler to adjust laterally. A senior moment!
     
  11. Jamie Kennedy
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    Jamie Kennedy Senior Member

    You might look at a "flyway jib pole" like they use now on the Enterprise and Albacore.
     

  12. Marmoset
    Joined: Aug 2014
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    Marmoset Senior Member

    Which reminds me! haha Id always had the thought that on a multi, maybe a twin barber setup outside cockpit, might be handy versus single center track.


    Barry
     
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